Category: artist

Interview: Martha J Allard

Today we’re joined by Martha J Allard. Martha is a phenomenal author who writes various kinds of fantasy. She writes both short stories and novels. Her work is mostly dark and contemporary fantasy. Her novel is entitled Black Light and it sounds fascinating. It’s clear she’s a dedicated and passionate writer, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

I write fiction, mostly dark and contemporary fantasy. I
write both short stories and novels. My first one of those came out a two years
ago called Black Light. It’s about
rock and roll and finding yourself in what you want.

What inspires you?

I always try to look for the magic hidden in normal life. I
believe it’s always there, but we can’t always see it. I try to put that in my
writing.

What got you interested
in your field?  Have you always wanted to
be an artist?

Yes, I’ve always wanted to be a writer. I grew up with a
book in my hand. I traded Laura Ingles Wilder for Anne of Green Gables, for the
Nine Princes in Amber and on. I loved all those stories and more, but there
were no characters that I could identify with.

I grew up in a small town in Michigan, in the late 70’s. It
was miles and miles away from any queer culture. I didn’t know it existed, much
less that I could be a part of it.

One night I waited until my parents were asleep and snuck
back downstairs to the TV to watch videos. This was pre-MTV. They played a
video by David Bowie called I Am A DJ. I was riveted, never having seen him
before. In the video, a man comes up to Bowie on the street to kiss him. This
opened my small-town brain up to the possibilities that lay beyond my tiny
borders. Somehow those possibilities got my pen moving.  

Do you have any kind
of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work
that you’d be willing to reveal?

Well, yes. Or I think of them as Easter eggs, really.
Because of my connection to Bowie, I always put something of him in my work.
Sometimes it’s small, something nobody but me will notice, and sometimes it’s
bigger, for example the entire plot of Black Light started out with one of his
songs.

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

Don’t write what you know. Write what you want to discover.
Write the things that scare you and let your words be wild.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum
do you identify?

I came to asexuality late in life. In the past I’ve also
identified as Bi and Lesbian. I feel that I can only speak for right now, and
right now I feel Panromantic.

Have you encountered
any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I write queer fiction, and so I rub shoulders with other
queer writers. When I first came out as Ace, some of them advised against it. I
was surprised, because I had already identified as queer, and had for years.
I’ve found that some people think of Asexual as “damaged,” and I didn’t want to
be thought of like that, did I?

No. I didn’t. So when I came out to people, I armed myself
with explanations, reasons for my sexuality. But finally, I stopped myself. Now
I deal with push back by not apologizing, but it took a while.  

What’s the most
common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

As I mentioned above, it’s that somehow, I became asexual
because of damaged I’ve suffered.  Also
that I’m wasting myself? That one always makes me laugh. It feels just the
opposite to me.

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their
orientation?

I would say, it’s a journey, not a destination. For me, each
day is different, sometimes a little, sometimes a lot, and as David Bowie
famously said once, “All I can tell you is what I feel right now.”

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

My website: https://www.marthajallard.com/
My Facebook page: marthajallard
Amazon link to Black Light: http://a.co/d/bT1PCsp

Thank you, Martha, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: CHM

Today we’re joined by CHM. CHM is a wonderful versatile writer. She has written in a few genres and styles. She mostly writes fantasy and historical fiction. When she’s not writing original work, CHM also dabbles in fanfiction. It’s clear she’s a dedicated writer, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

My art is mostly creative writing. I mostly write fantasy
and historical fiction, as well as fanfiction.

What inspires you?

A number of things, but mostly music, and my own personal
experiences.

What got you
interested in your field?  Have you
always wanted to be an artist?

I used to read a lot, and that slowly got me into writing my
own stories. I also tend to daydream, and story ideas seem to spawn from
daydreams.

Do you have any kind
of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work
that you’d be willing to reveal?

I really like ending books with the title when possible.

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

Don’t apologize for your work when presenting it. Stop
yourself from saying things like “Sorry in advance” or “This is terrible, but”
because it’s not. It’s the best you can do at that moment, and putting yourself
down doesn’t help you improve.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum
do you identify?

I’m an AroAce lesbian. Oriented AroAces feel other types of
attraction strong enough to warrant their own labels in their identities. The
ones I feel are sensual and alterous attraction.

Have you encountered
any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Never in my field, but in my personal life, I have. I
usually deal with it using calm explanations.

What’s the most
common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That we all hate sex, or that we just need to wait a while
for sexual attraction to happen.

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their
orientation?

No matter what you hear, no matter who says it to you, your
identity is real, and you have a strong community backing you up. It doesn’t
matter what someone else says about your identity, all that matters is the way
the words you use to describe yourself make you feel.

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

I post all my fanfiction on my Quotev account! At LOZelfafan

Thank you, CHM, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Call for Interviewees

asexualartists:

asexualartists:

asexualartists:

Hello all!

Once again, I’m low on interviewees. Since I don’t have the time to constantly post calls every single time I’m running low, I’m hoping to use this post as a kind of a reminder:

ASEXUAL ARTISTS IS OPEN FOR INTERVIEWS YEAR-ROUND!

I’m always looking for artists who are on the spectrum to interview. Any and all kinds of artists are welcome.

This is including but not limited to:

WRITERS: all genres and forms are welcome (novelists, short stories, poetry, flash fiction, etc). It doesn’t matter if you’re unpublished, just starting out, a student, a hobbyist, or established. Traditionally published, self-published, small press, etc. You’re all welcome and you all have something to offer.

VISUAL ARTISTS: Self explanatory, any kind of visual art you can imagine (photography, painting, sketching, drawing, sculpture, installation, etc.).

FANARTISTS: Another self-explanatory category. Cosplay, visual, fanfiction, etc. Whatever you do in your fandom (any and all fandoms welcome), you’re an artist.

FILMMAKERS: YouTubers, directors, cinematographers, anything that has to do with making films (short, features, documentaries, etc).

PERFORMANCE ARTS: actors, theater arts, singers, mimes, any sort of performers.

DANCERS: Any kind of dance style you can imagine is welcome here (ballet, tap, jazz, contemporary, burlesque, belly-dancing, ballroom, etc.)

MUSICIANS: playing instruments, composing, singing, anything involving music

CULINARY: maybe your medium of choice is food. If so, you’re welcome here.

CRAFTS: any sort of craft you can think of (sewing, knitting, crocheting, candle making, jewelry making, etc.)

All levels of artists are welcome: whether you’re a student or a professional, just starting out or already established. If you create, you have something to offer and therefore I want to interview you 🙂

If you’re still unsure whether or not your art qualifies (there’s a 97.9% chance it will), and your question isn’t answered in the F.A.Q., please contact me at laurenjankowski27@gmail.com

If you want to be interviewed, please email me at the same address (laurenjankowski27@gmail.com)

This site continues because I get requests for interviews. If the interviews run out, this site will remain as a resource 🙂 Updates will continue as long as there are aces out there willing to be interviewed.

Thank you, everybody.

Hey everyone!

Still open for interviews. And I just want all you amazing, talented, wonderful artists who have already been interviewed: you are making such a difference. Giving an interview may seem like a small thing, perhaps even insignificant, but believe me when I say that so many aces have found comfort and inspiration in your words. I have received numerous messages about how much this blog means to people, especially to aces still coming to terms with their identity. That’s a truly wonderful thing 😃

So please, keep those interview requests coming!

Hey everyone!

Still need more interviews, but just a reminder: I don’t respond to interview requests via reblogs or comments. If you are interested in being featured on this blog, please email me: laurenjankowski27@gmail.com

All ages, races, religions, genders are welcome. If you’re on the ace spectrum and you create, I would love to interview you for this blog.

ALL aces are welcome on this blog! It doesn’t matter if you’re a hobbyist, a professional, a dabbler, a student, aspiring or experienced. Your art is important. Your voice is important.

So please, keep those interview requests coming 😀 <3

Interview: Emily Jane

Today we’re joined by Emily Jane. Emily is a phenomenal artist who does a bit of everything. She enjoys singing, writing, and drawing, but her main passion is photography. Emily has a great passion for creating and is incredibly enthusiastic, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

I’m a sort of jack of all trades artist to be honest. I love
to sing, write, draw, photograph…I love many things, and try not to limit
myself to just one. When I sing, I often sing about my personal experiences,
but when I’m writing, I try to immerse myself in my characters. To me, art
should express something about the artist or the subject that he or she has not
or cannot share with the world. I try to capture that in my photography as
well- to find a secret and exploit it on camera- though the person seeing the
photo won’t see the secret, they might catch a hint of emotion tagging along
the end of it.

What inspires you?

Oh, gosh, the list is endless. A current inspiration is just
the existence of people. People, as a whole, are so miraculous. They live, they
breath, they exist and one of my favorite things is catching them doing that. I
also try to find myself in my work. I try to ask myself, who am I? What person
do I show to others, and is that person really me?

What got you
interested in your field?  Have you
always wanted to be an artist?

Unfortunately enough, I think the person that got me into my
field was my mother, though I really don’t want to credit her with anything
that I love. She was a graphic designer in college, and just frankly an
extremely creative person… Without her influence, I doubt I would have found
myself as deeply entrenched in the artistic world as I do.

Ever since I’ve remembered, I’ve wanted to be an artist, but
I often wonder about the differences between nature and nurture. Had my father,
who is an engineer, had more to do with my growing into myself, would I be
leaning more into the STEM fields? Or had I grown up in a family that didn’t focus
me on anything, would I have begun to lean towards a completely different
field? The world may never know.

Do you have any kind
of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work
that you’d be willing to reveal?

I don’t know if I have a specific symbol in my work… I often
draw young women. I think that might be because of my sexuality, me trying to
draw potential girlfriends haha!

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

I would encourage them to never give up! I have received so
much backlash from my work- being labeled the weird emo girl (because
apparently only emo people draw??), people yelling at me for drawing different
body types… it’s not ideal, that’s for sure. But never give up on your art. And
remember, while it’s not wrong to want praise for your work, the person you
most need to accept your work is yourself.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum
do you identify?

As of now, I identify as a panromantic asexual. I’m
attracted to people, not what’s in their pants- probably because I never want
to touch what’s in their pants haha.

Have you encountered
any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Not so much relating to my field as to me as a person. As of
now, I am only halfway out of the closet with one person, which means that she
knows I’m asexual, but not that I’m panromantic. I have experience aphobic
things in my dating life, unfortunately. Guys seem to be under the impression
that everybody loves kissing and sex, and they get angry when you say you
aren’t into either of those things. Since I’m not out of the closet, I’ve never
dated a female, so I’ve no idea how they would react to being told that I do
not like sex.

What’s the most
common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

The most common misconception I see about asexuality is the
idea that people who identify as asexual also do not have romantic
relationships, or that all ace people are also aromantic. Not only is this
patently false, but it harms people who are asexual by promoting the idea that
we don’t want romance. It also harms people who are not on the asexual scale by
promoting the idea that all romantic relationships must involve sex or it’s not
really a romantic relationship, which can be INCREDIBLY toxic.

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their
orientation?

Sure! Just remember that no matter how many people turn you
down or scoff at you for your sexuality, you are VALID!! You may be more on the
graysexual scale, and that’s totally fine. Humanity is filled with so many
people of so many types- it only makes sense that you won’t fit in a box
completely perfectly. And remember also- you don’t have to figure it all out
yet! People change- you may change as well, and that’s totally okay and valid.

Sure! Just remember that no matter how many people turn you
down or scoff at you for your sexuality, you are VALID!! You may be more on the
graysexual scale, and that’s totally fine. Humanity is filled with so many
people of so many types- it only makes sense that you won’t fit in a box
completely perfectly. And remember also- you don’t have to figure it all out
yet! People change- you may change as well, and that’s totally okay and valid.

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

I’m not really online at all except for my Tumblr account.
Feel free to stop by and say hi to me at uppercase-ace 😉

Thank you, Emily, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Erin Malo

Today we’re joined by Erin Malo. Erin is a phenomenal visual artist who was interviewed some time ago on this site. She has done quite a bit of work since then, including some design work on asexuality. She works in a number of mediums, both traditional and digital. Her work is fascinating and diverse, showing a great amount of talent. It’s clear she’s a passionate artist who loves what she does, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

I’m a 4th year visual communication design student, and I
work primarily with logos and identity branding. I also love both digital and
traditional illustration, and traditional art when I have the free time.
Photography is a recent darling of mine as well. I guess I do a little bit of
everything!

What inspires you?

When it comes to design, I get really inspired by other
creators. I can scroll Instagram and Pinterest for hours, looking at all the
amazing and unique ideas people have! In my illustration work, I’m endlessly
inspired by the various D&D campaigns I’m in. I feel like I’m always doodling
the characters and the monsters we come across. For my traditional art, I’m
inspired by the body and the natural world.

What got you
interested in your field?  Have you
always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve always wanted to be an artist, as far as I remember. I
loved art as a kid, so I did it a lot and got good at it. I didn’t want to
formally pursue art after high school because it’s such a difficult field to
break into, especially in a fairly small city like Edmonton, so I looked into
animation, interior design, and visual communication design, and settled on the
latter. It turned out to be much closer to my heart than I expected, and 4
years into my degree I’m still loving it!

Do you have any kind
of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work
that you’d be willing to reveal?

No, I don’t think I do.

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

Nobody can create exactly what you can. Don’t get
discouraged because there’s artists out there better than you. Just do your own
unique thing, and do it lots, and share it with everyone you can. You’ll find
the people who love what only you can do, even when you don’t always love everything
you make.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum
do you identify?

I identify as asexual when asked, but I’m probably more
specifically demisexual. I’m biromantic as well.

Have you encountered
any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I’ve received very little negativity in person when it comes
to my identity. I’m pretty open about being asexual, so if people have a
problem with me, they’re staying quiet. I presented a zine I made on asexuality
to my design classmates in my second year, and I got polite curiosity and even
some praise for my openness.

What’s the most
common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Definitely that (some) asexual people never have sex, or are
incapable of sex. It’s very difficult to explain to people that attraction is
highly separate from libido – especially when those people are people you don’t
necessarily want to sit down and have a conversation about sex with. An unfortunate
part of coming out as ace (I’ve found) is having to do the internal work to
understand how your own attractions and feelings mesh together, and then
articulate that to others if you want them to have an accurate picture of what
asexuality is to you. Not that it’s anyone’s business. I just have less and
less pride about it every passing year and I’m fine detailing the nitty-gritty
to people who ask me questions. Aces with big ol’ sex drives exist, and I’ve
had to become fine with explaining that to non-aces.

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their
orientation?

You’ll probably figure it out, but if you don’t, that’s okay
too. It doesn’t matter how long you identify as ace, you will likely always
doubt that you’re “actually” ace, and that’s okay. If it’s comforting to you
and it describes your experience better than other labels in the moment, by all
means, use it. Also, if you’re feeling like aces aren’t accepted in the queer
community, get off Tumblr, and go make your presence known in a LGTBQA+ group
in your school, community, whatever. You’re much more accepted and wanted than
others would have you believe.

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

I’ve got an art blog on here at neon-biology, and an Instagram
account full of art at erin_aceous.
As well, if you’d like a free 12-page pdf. of my zine on asexuality, titled “Visible”,
you can email me at emalo[at]ualberta[dot]ca.

Thank you, Erin, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Dawne

Today we’re joined by Dawne. Dawne is a phenomenal YouTuber who has a channel about traveling. She has recently started it and hopes to help out those interested in traveling. She has excellent advice about traveling on a budget. She’s an amazingly enthusiastic and dedicated artist, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

My name is Dawne, pronouns she/her, and I am a YouTuber. I
have a budget travel guide channel for the beginner and non-adventurous
travelers. In my videos, I give realistic advice for those that cannot afford
luxury vacations. I also try to help with travel anxiety, itinerary planning,
and safety.

What inspires you?

I’ve always loved other cultures. I am in love with the
world and with humans. To me, life isn’t something that you should punch in,
work until you’re exhausted, then punch out. I love the look in people’s eyes
when I talk about my trips. I love convincing them to jump off the deep end
into an adventure they’d never considered trying before. People inspire me.

What got you
interested in your field?  Have you
always wanted to be an artist?

When I used to watch travel videos, it was always someone
who either traveled for work, or had funds to buy expensive gear and vacations.
Many also gave travel advice based on an active and adventurous lifestyle. Most
of the people I know don’t have a lot to invest towards traveling, and it can
be scary to take that first step. I wanted to encourage my friends to go see
more of the world, and it sort of blossomed into a travel channel.

Do you have any kind
of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work
that you’d be willing to reveal?

Right now, I am still working on building my brand, so I
don’t have much of a symbol right now. One feature, though, that I do include
is that every tutorial “how-to” video of mine concludes with an
optimistic pep talk. A sort of calming call to action – and that action is to
get out and see the world.

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

Don’t worry about becoming famous. If fame is all you are
concerned with, you risk losing yourself in the process. Don’t ever give up
your originality and enjoyment of the project you are invested in for an
audience.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum
do you identify?

I identify as a Demiromantic Asexual.

Have you encountered
any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

When traveling as an LGBT single woman, I have to be careful
where I travel to and where I advise others to go. There have been times when I
am researching a location to visit, only to find that not being in a
relationship, or not traveling with a man can be looked down upon. Even
dangerous. I just try to educate myself as much as possible before telling my
audience to visit a location that could harm them.

What’s the most
common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That it means I am antisocial, or just don’t want to be in a
relationship. Since I am the only one of my friends and family that is not in a
relationship, and I am the only one they know who is asexual, they often
combine the two as one.

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their
orientation?

It’s okay not to be sure. There is no rule or requirement
that you have to be a certain way or act a certain way to be asexual. You are
literally the only one that matters when it comes to being comfortable with
your orientation. Take the time you need or change your label every day – it
doesn’t matter. You are you and that’s what is important.

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Ouh9NmQQzN-00-nl7Ljsw
Tumblr: at dawneofanewday
Twitter: https://twitter.com/dawneofanewday

Thank you, Dawne, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Skyler

Today we’re joined by Skyler. Skyler is a wonderful fanartist who has written a massive amount of fics in the Doctor Who fandom. She writes fics about the 10th Doctor and Rose Tyler. Aside from fics, Skyler has also created moodboards and 8 tracks. She’s clearly a passionate artist who enjoys what she does, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

I have written about 145 fanfics for the Billie Piper and
David Tennant fandom. Most of those are Doctor
Who
, for the Tenth Doctor x Rose Tyler ship (sort of. It’s sci-fi complicated.).
I’ve also made some playlists on 8tracks with manips for cover art and
moodboards and such for this ship.

What inspires you?

I think since I’m aro ace, I find relationships fascinating,
and I love exploring the drama and what-ifs.

What got you
interested in your field?  Have you
always wanted to be an artist?

I started reading fanfic when I was a preteen on a message
board and by the time Harry Potter peaked in popularity around my high school
and college years, I was reading tons of fic. I deeply wished I could create a
Fanfic.net account and start posting. But I was too scared and never did it. I
came back to fic after college when I watched Doctor Who and needed to know
what happened after the happily-ever-after. I started reading fic and had all
these ideas about what I would do with that story. That’s another thing that
motivates me: wanting more than we were given about how a plot point or
relationship tied up.

Do you have any kind
of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work
that you’d be willing to reveal?

Having the voices of the characters in my head, thinking
about how the actors would say it, how the character would perceive each
other’s actions… if I don’t have that, I can’t write. It wouldn’t be any good.
But when I do, people say I have captured them well, so it’s worth the battle
to push through.

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

There are not as many rules as you think there are. We all
have insecurity. It is tempting to think of fandom as this cool kid table where
you have to get permission to join, but you don’t. Just write. Create what YOU
like. Read as much as you want, and yes there will be fanon that people
consider sacred or whatever, but some of the best fic is from writers who are
new to the scene because they don’t get trapped in the same tropes done the
same way. When you’re in a fandom a long time, it’s tempting to write the same
thing over and over 100 times that everyone else is writing. But new writers don’t
have that sense of conformity. If you can preserve that curiosity and wonder
while also gaining experience and growing as a writer, that’s when true art is
born.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum
do you identify?

Aegoromantic/aegosexual (aro ace for short)

Have you encountered
any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

There’s always aphobes on Tumblr, who aren’t worth my time,
but my actual community has been hugely supportive. I would say all the
prejudice and ignorance from people who matter has been internal. I limited
myself because I didn’t think I could be ace if I like writing and reading smut
(then I found the aegosexual label!). Then I made a post about it and it still
shows up in my notifications years later. I was so afraid to publish my fic for
Pride last year about Rose being bisexual and the Doctor being demisexual. It
was really personal for me. But people are still leaving comments a about how
much that story meant to them. So I think we limit ourselves a lot more than we
should.

What’s the most
common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

There are so many out there, but one personally is that people
don’t understand the split attraction model. Usually it doesn’t both me because
I’m both aro and ace, but I do have aesthetic attraction, and people don’t
really get that. I like the visual of a “hot” person and can call people
“sexy,” but that doesn’t mean I personally want to have sex with them. lol It’s
just an expression to explain what type of aesthetic appeal they have. Which
probably doesn’t make sense to people who do experience sexual attraction, but
when you don’t, it is like a huge lightbulb.

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their
orientation?

First, it’s OK to change labels later if you decide you were
wrong. Second, it’s a spectrum so you probably weren’t wrong, just somewhere
else on the spectrum than you thought. And third, you can also be sure! Even if
you’re a teen, you don’t have to “wait until you get older” to identify as ace.
You can be ace at any age. It’s also not a Tumblr thing. People have been ace a
lot longer than Tumblr has been around.

Also, just ignore the discourse. It is minimally helpful
just to be familiar with the arguments people are using these days, but it’s
not worth getting upset about and definitely isn’t worth engaging. Just gather
real fellow aces and allies you can count on and support each other.

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

The best place to read my writing is AO3: Skyler10. My Tumblr
is Skyler10fic. And here is my edit tag and 8tracks.

Thank you, Skyler, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Matthew Maione

Today we’re joined by Matthew Maione. Matthew is a phenomenal visual artist who also writes and creates fanart. He enjoys drawing faces and also does quite a lot of fanart. When he’s not creating visual art, Matthew enjoys writing and writes both fanfiction and original work. He’s particularly fond of historical fiction and crime suspense. It’s clear he’s an incredibly dedicated artist who loves to create as you’ll soon read. My thanks to him for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I am a
virtual artist and creative writer. I enjoy drawing faces and fanart.  I like playing with colour and texture a lot.
I write almost entirely fanfiction and fiction. Historical fiction and Crime
Suspense novels are some of my favourite to write.

What inspires you?

Music is a
huge inspiration in my life, it can get me in certain moods that are perfect
for writing. My fiancé often inspires me with the little things she does,
dances around the house that make me want to write romance. Nature gives me a
breath of life, revitalizes me and makes me want to draw.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

It was
actually my older sister, she is a cosplay and traditional artist. She is 5
years older than me and I, being a younger sibling, was jealous and decided I
needed to be better than her. Now I do it because I love it, of course.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol,
or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I used to
but since I lost most of my sight I’ve just been trying to re-explore what my
art is. Playing with styles and shading to recreate it so I can still actually
create, I used to sign my older works.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

Don’t give
up! Make your weaknesses your strengths! There is no reason why you can’t
pursue art if it’s what you love. Always do what makes you happiest, not what
others want you to do.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I identify
as Grey-ace. I don’t really experience sexual attraction, but if I have a
strong romantic connection with someone I am able to connect with them in that
way as well. But it’s more of a, I do it because I love them and want to make
them happy. Not to say that is the only way to do so, there are many ways to
connect with your partners and sex is never a mandatory part of a relationship,
but it can enhance your romantic connection. Simply put, while I don’t
experience sexual attraction, for me, being intimate occasionally makes me feel
emotionally closer.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance
in your field?  If so, how do you handle
it?

I haven’t
really in my field. It’s not something that just casually comes up in
conversation but those I have told have all been very understanding. A few
people I told were even comfortable enough with me after the fact that they
were able to come out to me as well. In my daily life a few people have said
that it’s because I hadn’t met the right person, or claimed they could fix me,
very common things to run into. I mostly just ignore this and do my best to
stay safe.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality that
you’ve encountered?

That I’ll
never be able to have a permanent partner or that it’s a phase. I have a fiancé
who has no problems with it, we have been together for two years. She is always
very understanding if I’m having a repulsed day, because there are good and bad
days. Some days I’m totally okay with the idea of sex and others I can’t stand
to watch movies with implied scenes in them. But if you’re worried about
finding someone who will love you, of course you will. There’s somebody for
everyone.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals out
there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Being
asexual, while it is a way to identify, does not define you. If the thought of
it is new or uncomfortable, it’s just another part of wat makes you, you. It’s
not something to be ashamed of or hide, there are so many people out there who
will accept you for exactly who you are.

Finally, where can people find out more about your work?

My Tumblr
is Naoki-arts, I have AO3, Ammarettu. I’m currently working on getting my first novel published
so any news on that will be found there as well!

Thank you, Matthew, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Announcement: Ace Art Show!

asexualartists:

Hi everyone!

I come to you today with a huge exciting announcement. Next year, April 26th – 27th, I’m co-curating an art show for asexual identifying artists. Next April, there is going to be an international asexual conference in Canada entitled,

“Unthinking Sex,
Imagining Asexuality: Intersectional and Interdisciplinary Perspectives.” As part of the conference, there’s going to be an art show in a gallery featuring the work of asexual-identifying artists. This would be an amazing thing to put on your resume. We’re also going to have a table to display books and zines written by asexual writers.

I am super excited to have been offered this opportunity and I hope that some of  you will consider submitting work. I have interviewed so many talented artists and I’d love to show off your work to the world.

My co-curator, Heather, and I have written up the following call for artists. I’m looking forward to hearing from many of you.


CALL FOR ARTISTS

The inaugural
international conference “Unthinking
Sex, Imagining Asexuality: Intersectional and Interdisciplinary Perspectives”
will be held April 26-27, 2019 at Simon Fraser University’s Harbour Centre
Campus in Vancouver, located on unceded Coast Salish Territory, the traditional
territories of Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh First Nations. We are
excited to announce an Asexual Art Show to be held in tandem at a local gallery
in Vancouver, and we want your work!

Submissions will be received up to 12:00pm
(Pacific Standard Time) on:
Tuesday, January 1, 2019

Eligibility:

  • To apply to this Call for Artists you must be
    someone who self-identifies as asexual and/or aromantic (including
    gray-asexual, demisexual, or on the ace spectrum).
  • You must be someone who creates art, broadly
    understood (including, but not limited to: painting, digitized art, visual
    poetry, mixed media, photography, drawing, printmaking, etc.).
  • Authors and zine-makers are also welcome to
    submit work (there will be a table to display written works by ace-identifying
    creators).

Details:

  • This exhibition does not charge exhibiting
    artists to display their works.
  • Unfortunately, due to
    the size and nature of our gallery space, we are unable to accept any
    sculptures or installation art. Please only submit 2D, and/or ready wall-mounted
    3D works.

Application:

  • Attach to email no
    more than 5 images of your work (.jpg format- 300 dpi, no more than a total of 5MB).
  • Should you be
    submitting more than one work for consideration, please provide only 2-3 images
    of each work.
  • Proposed artwork must
    include title, material(s), dimensions, and date.
  • Please include a short
    bio (75 words max).
  • Please also include an
    artist statement that provides an introduction to your practice and artworks
    submitted (250 words max).
  • Selected artists are
    responsible for delivery, or shipment (as well as return shipping), of their
    works. Low-income artists, or artists that need financial assistance to
    participate, may be eligible for financial support.
  • Artwork must be ready
    to display (printed, ready-mounted, or framed).

All submissions must
be in pdf format and emailed to aceartshow[at]gmail[dot]com by January 1, 2019 at noon. Artists will
be notified no later than February 15,
2019
if their submission has been accepted for the art show.

Contact:

Should you have any
questions regarding the conference or your application, please direct them to Lauren Jankowski and
Heather Prost at aceartshow[at]gmail[dot]com


I will periodically reblog this to remind artists who follow this site as well as for anyone who may miss it the first time around.

Thanks, everyone!

Call for Interviewees

asexualartists:

asexualartists:

asexualartists:

Hello all!

Once again, I’m low on interviewees. Since I don’t have the time to constantly post calls every single time I’m running low, I’m hoping to use this post as a kind of a reminder:

ASEXUAL ARTISTS IS OPEN FOR INTERVIEWS YEAR-ROUND!

I’m always looking for artists who are on the spectrum to interview. Any and all kinds of artists are welcome.

This is including but not limited to:

WRITERS: all genres and forms are welcome (novelists, short stories, poetry, flash fiction, etc). It doesn’t matter if you’re unpublished, just starting out, a student, a hobbyist, or established. Traditionally published, self-published, small press, etc. You’re all welcome and you all have something to offer.

VISUAL ARTISTS: Self explanatory, any kind of visual art you can imagine (photography, painting, sketching, drawing, sculpture, installation, etc.).

FANARTISTS: Another self-explanatory category. Cosplay, visual, fanfiction, etc. Whatever you do in your fandom (any and all fandoms welcome), you’re an artist.

FILMMAKERS: YouTubers, directors, cinematographers, anything that has to do with making films (short, features, documentaries, etc).

PERFORMANCE ARTS: actors, theater arts, singers, mimes, any sort of performers.

DANCERS: Any kind of dance style you can imagine is welcome here (ballet, tap, jazz, contemporary, burlesque, belly-dancing, ballroom, etc.)

MUSICIANS: playing instruments, composing, singing, anything involving music

CULINARY: maybe your medium of choice is food. If so, you’re welcome here.

CRAFTS: any sort of craft you can think of (sewing, knitting, crocheting, candle making, jewelry making, etc.)

All levels of artists are welcome: whether you’re a student or a professional, just starting out or already established. If you create, you have something to offer and therefore I want to interview you 🙂

If you’re still unsure whether or not your art qualifies (there’s a 97.9% chance it will), and your question isn’t answered in the F.A.Q., please contact me at laurenjankowski27@gmail.com

If you want to be interviewed, please email me at the same address (laurenjankowski27@gmail.com)

This site continues because I get requests for interviews. If the interviews run out, this site will remain as a resource 🙂 Updates will continue as long as there are aces out there willing to be interviewed.

Thank you, everybody.

Hey everyone!

Still open for interviews. And I just want all you amazing, talented, wonderful artists who have already been interviewed: you are making such a difference. Giving an interview may seem like a small thing, perhaps even insignificant, but believe me when I say that so many aces have found comfort and inspiration in your words. I have received numerous messages about how much this blog means to people, especially to aces still coming to terms with their identity. That’s a truly wonderful thing 😃

So please, keep those interview requests coming!

Hey everyone!

Still need more interviews, but just a reminder: I don’t respond to interview requests via reblogs or comments. If you are interested in being featured on this blog, please email me: laurenjankowski27@gmail.com

All ages, races, religions, genders are welcome. If you’re on the ace spectrum and you create, I would love to interview you for this blog.

ALL aces are welcome on this blog! It doesn’t matter if you’re a hobbyist, a professional, a dabbler, a student, aspiring or experienced. Your art is important. Your voice is important.

So please, keep those interview requests coming 😀 <3