Category: drawing

Interview: Gemma Irene

Today we’re joined by Gemma Irene. Gemma is a phenomenal writer who writes a variety of things. She’s written a few novels and hundreds of poems, as well as some fanfiction. When she’s not writing, she enjoys visual art. Gemma draws, paints, sews, and takes photographs. She even plays the violin. It’s clear she’s a dedicated and passionate individual who loves to create, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

I’m primarily a writer, though I’ve been known to draw,
paint, sew, take pictures, and play violin. Anything to keep my hands busy! As
far as writing goes, I stick to fiction, with occasional detours for poetry,
and a song on the very rare occasion. I haven’t published anything yet, but
I’ve got about three original novels and around a hundred poems under my belt.
I’ve also been pretty immersed in fan fiction the past few years, writing for The Phantom of the Opera, The Boondock
Saints, The Walking Dead
, and Supernatural.

What inspires you?

I hate to say it, it sounds cliché, but inspiration comes
from anywhere and everywhere. I wrote my first novel after a daydream I had
when I was bored at the mall and trying to entertain myself. I’ve drawn things
I’ve seen in dreams. I’ve photographed things that happened to catch my eye.
One of my favorite poems I ever wrote came about while I was sitting outside
listening to the creek flow. I try to stay alert to anything that feeds the
muse, which means either living very much in the moment, or hiding out in my
own little world.

What got you
interested in your field?  Have you
always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve always loved stories and storytelling. One of my
earliest memories is of sitting in my grandpa’s lap with a book, with me
reading to him as much as he read to me. I remember telling stories to my
mother and her writing them down in a blank journal. I relate a lot to Anne
Shirley, or Sara Crewe in A Little Princess like that; my stories always
started as a game of pretend, and realizing I could share them with people was
a game changer. With the Internet, I could share with even more people. And in
the case of fan fiction, connecting with people who were as passionate about
the same characters as I was helped me get even more joy out of it. So, long
answer to a short question, I’ve always wanted to do this!

Do
you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you
include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

In my writing, I notice a lot of alliteration, and a lot of fire imagery. I like getting down
into the deep, personal aspects of storytelling, so I’m very concerned with the
soulful and intimate. I don’t know if there’s any specific thing that
watermarks my writing as mine…if any readers would like to point something
out?

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

Experiment. Let yourself suck. That first novel I wrote? As
is, nobody is reading that, if I have
anything to say about it. There’s a lot of hang-ups about being trite or
cringey, but that’s the only way you grow and evolve. And it’s cool if you want
to pursue more interests than one, or if you’re only so-so at something else
but do it for the joy of it. I’ve worked for years at my writing, but only ever
turned to drawing when I needed the release it gave me. Consequently, it’s not
one of my strongest skills. Same deal with the violin. I’ll never be the next
Van Gogh, or play in an orchestra, but that’s fine. I draw and play for love of
both, and that’s enough for me.

The inverse is true, as well. If you’re passionate about
your art, don’t be afraid to invest yourself in it. Any way you feel called to.
I’m going to go off on a tangent for a second and say how glad I am that fan
fic is slowly getting positive traction, because if I hadn’t started writing
fic, I would never have found an audience, much less one willing to give
feedback and help me grow as a writer. That’s the thing about finding someone
genuinely interested in what you’re sharing, they want more, and they’ll often help you in the process. Whether it’s
encouragement, advice, or simple enthusiasm, it’s out there. Hold it up to your
ear and give it a listen, then decide if it will help you develop your art.
Keep what does, discard what doesn’t. That’s what fan fiction did for me, is
help me find my voice a lot sooner than I might have without it.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum
do you identify?

I’m a panromantic demisexual, which is at once very broad
and very specific. To me, they go hand-in-hand. I don’t develop sexual
attraction without an emotional bond, and if I’ve gotten close enough to
someone to form that bond, I’m unlikely to care about gender. It’s the person I’ve developed feelings for.

Have you encountered
any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

In my field? No. In my life? A bit. I was discussing
sexuality and orientation with a group of ordinarily open-minded individuals
and casually mentioned I identify as demi. I explained it was similar to being
asexual, and they were on board with the ace part but casually dismissed the
demi part. “Some people just want to be special.” It took a while to get past
that, and I’ve presented myself since then a little differently. On social
media, I proudly post all the ace, aro, demi, bi, pan, gay, trans, nb, everything, supporting positivity that I
want to see in the world. In person, I’ll comment on my aesthetic attractions,
regardless of gender, I’ll express support of representation, and shut down
discourse when I hear it. I do what I can to be an ally and a safe space, and
hopefully send a message that I won’t stand for any prejudice.

What’s the most
common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That we’re prudes, afraid of sex, damaged, or “waiting for
the right person.” Yeah, some of us are, but so are some allosexuals. Sexuality
is such a complex, complicated subject, and I don’t understand the aphobia and
ace discourse I’ve seen. The thing is, we’ve always been here, it’s just that
now we’re willing to claim our space, and hopefully we can spread more
knowledge to put an end to the misconceptions.

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their
orientation?

Hang in there. It’s a process. I remember that I was elated
at first to realize I was demi, then I had to process what that meant to me,
evaluate my relationships with people in light of my new understanding of my
identity, decide whether this was something I wanted to keep to myself or make
known to others. Then on down the line, after I felt reasonably secure in my
identity, I realized I was panromantic and had to start all over again. I’ve
found my writing is a very good way to explore my sexuality and my orientation,
and I’m working on more aspec characters to reflect how I feel about my
identity.

My biggest ongoing struggle is feeling ace enough to
identify on the spectrum. I’m very sex positive, and I lean towards the, let’s
say, colorful side of sexual expression, which is far removed from the
misconception about asexuals and how we’re all prudes afraid of sex. That’s
where the ignorance hurts us the most, in my opinion. We measure ourselves by
the stereotypes and assumptions, which are often incorrect, and we cut
ourselves down when we don’t fit. Thing is, I’m still aspec whether I like sex
or hate it, whether I’m kinky or vanilla, because it’s about attraction, not
action.

Aces, grays, and demis, you do you. Own your identity. Share
it if you want, or keep it secret. It’s who you are, and it’s as much about
discovery as the rest of you.

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

Tumblr is my primary hang out. My URL is at risingphoenix761, and my blog
is a giant mess of fandom, writing, music, humor, and positivity. I’m also on
Fanfiction.Net as AngelxPhoenix,
and Archive of Our Own as RisingPhoenix761.
For anyone interested in my visual art (I consider myself a passionate
amateur), my Instagram is at risingphoenix_761. Come
say hi to me!

Thank you, Gemma, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Atraxura

Today we’re joined by Atraxura. Atraxura is a wonderful visual artist who specializes in drawing. She also paints, takes pictures, and makes jewelry, but she’s focused mostly on her drawing. Atraxura enjoys using limited color and it results in very striking imagery. It’s clear she loves what she does, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participating in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

I experiment with many different styles and media. I draw,
paint, take photographs, make jewelry and write personal essays. In the past
year, I have been focusing on drawing, and I have begun to evolve a style in my
recent work with limited use of color, usually a vibrant, highly saturated red.
I prefer the warm end of the color spectrum, from yellow to red-violet, and
color psychology is integral to my work. I pay attention to geometry, ratios
and perspective. You don’t necessarily notice it in my work, but I am
fascinated with how important numbers are in aesthetics.

While I strive for realism, none of my subjects are merely
representational. Everything illustrates a concept: animals are symbolic, as
they were in ancient cultures. Skulls are the exoskeleton of the mind. A red
eye in a pale background represents the will rising above apathy.

What inspires you?

Horror inspires me on the aesthetic level. I am drawn to the
intense feelings it can evoke. I love high-energy excitement and intensity, not
calm or complacent “happiness”, which feel toxic and antithetical to
me. I want everything I do to reflect powerful, high-octave intensity.

I am a type-A person of a purely choleric temperament; ENTJ
on the MBTI. I have a very angry and hostile nature, and I like to explore and
defend this in my art. I also like to attack concepts I despise, e.g.,
conformity, complacency and all agents of passivity and inertia. I don’t do
this to “calm down” – I detest calm – or to get rid of anger. I do
it to communicate in a more powerful, profound way which reaches more people.

Collaboration with my soulmate, who is a musician and of
very similar views and vision, also inspires both of us. I hate working alone.

What got you
interested in your field?  Have you
always wanted to be an artist?

Art has always been instinctive for me. Inert matter, such
as a blank paper, exists to be acted upon. I want to change it to reflect my
ideas and vision. I want to communicate with others on the most profound level
possible. Art is naturally an ideal means for this, and for generating dialogue
with like minds. That said, I have never wanted to “be” any one
thing, but I always had a clear and exact vision of the lifestyle I wanted. It
has always been imperative that I live on my own terms in every aspect;
autonomous, being my own boss, keeping my own council.

Do you have any kind
of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

I initial every drawing and painting. The “A”,
along with being the initial of both my artist name and my legal name,
represents my highest values: ambition, high standards, and to be forever
striving upward. I strive to be the “alpha” in everything I do. If I
were perfect, I would want to push the boundaries of perfection. I am changing
the look of my initial now, to be more angular and volcanic.

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

Erase words like “can’t” and “hard” from
your vocabulary. I’ve destroyed innumerable paintings and drawings in rage when
things don’t go exactly the way I want, but I start over with a better
strategy. If something is difficult, it obsesses me. I persist until I get what
I want. I refuse to be defeated by my own art.

Also, learn the basics of your craft, and dedicate regular
time to work on improving your skills and becoming proficient with your
tools/media. Develop an honest perspective on your abilities, so you can see
your strengths and your areas which need improvement.

Finally, take yourself, your time, effort and ideas, very
seriously. Others won’t until you do.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum
do you identify?

I am a sex repulsed libidoist. Perhaps I am demi-hetero-sapio-romantic.
I met my soulmate on DeviantArt at the age of 23 and very quickly formed a deep
and intense obsession, but I had never had an interest in anyone else. It was
important to me that we have similar values and could interact on a profound
level. I emigrated to France from the United States at 25 so we could live
together. I don’t know if I would describe my feelings as merely romantic. I
feel like the word doesn’t convey enough intensity, and this intensity has only
increased with time.

Power in its multiple forms, especially knowledge, ignites
my libido, but even the thought of sexual activity disgusts me and extinguishes
the feeling. I find it revolting on the physical level (even with someone
hygienic and physically attractive) and deeply disturbing and traumatizing on
the emotional level (even with someone I love). For me, it threatens bonds
rather than building them. I also have an extremely low tolerance for boredom,
and despite the hype it gets, sex is the most tedious, banal activity which
ever existed – not to mention an enormous liability with no inherent benefits.

Have you encountered
any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I have read a lot about other aces experiencing prejudice,
but I have not experienced any myself – not in the arts, anyway. If I did
experience prejudice or ignorance, depending on the situation, I would try to
clarify my experience and perspective. It is important for us to speak out
about our own experiences and to be obstinate about this, so as not to let
“reality” be defined by others, especially if they are hostile to us.
After all, truth and wisdom are not usually found in numbers, even if strength
and volume are.

I am fortunate enough to have read an article about
asexuality in the (now extinct) magazine ElleGirl when I was 12 or 13 years
old, so I knew that asexuality existed and that it seemed to fit with how I
felt. If I hadn’t known about asexuality then, I would have probably
experienced a lot of distressing confusion about myself throughout my life.

Later, I read about “sublimating” the libido into
art or other activities, in The Satanic Bible, by Anton LaVey. (Napoleon
Hill’s book Think and Grow Rich also speaks of sublimating the libido.)
This in particular resonated with me deeply, as it described something which I
had always been doing. “Sublimation” of the libido has always been
natural for me, long before I knew what “sex” or
“masturbation” meant – whereas having sex, or even thinking about it,
still seems bizarre and unnatural to me. As I see it, sexual activity is only
one outlet for the libido and definitely not the driving force behind
it. I also realize that non-libidoist asexuals experience things differently
from me, so this may be a prejudice which they encounter.

What’s the most
common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Almost every time I have told anyone I was asexual, they ask
if I had been molested as a child. I have not experienced any kind of sexual
trauma at any point in my life – though I know that some asexuals have – and
I’m quite certain that I wouldn’t want to tell them if I had. This assumption
can annoy me, as I feel like they are implying that the notion of someone not
liking something “natural” is inconceivable unless the person had
experienced something terrible which turned them against it. I realize they may
not intend to imply anything.

I have had two different people try to use the fact that I
didn’t date as “evidence” that I was insane, though I had not
explicitly told these people I was asexual. I’m glad I didn’t waste my time and
efforts dating people I had zero interest in.

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their
orientation?

Above all, don’t settle for a life or a lifestyle you don’t
want, because someone –or society – pushes the idea that you “have
to” live a certain way. There is no “have to” in life, beyond
breathing. Seeking out positive and supportive people and choosing to spend
your time with them can help to not feel alienated and marginalized; it can
alleviate the pressure to behave a certain way to fit in.

I have always had a very exact vision of the life I wanted
from as long as I could remember, with no compromises. I’ve always felt the
need to live alone with a life partner or soulmate, with absolutely no children
or family, but possibly a pet. Someone accepting of my asexuality. Someone I
could be myself with and collaborate with. Someone who doesn’t smoke. Someone
with a unique fashion sense, as shallow as that may seem. For so long, it
seemed like no such person existed for me, yet “compromising” or
settling for anyone else would have been intolerable. Now, I am so grateful to
myself that I never did.

I know that there are people now, even among sexuals, who
are in the same place I was, fearing that they will be alone forever, and being
asexual can statistically narrow your options. I am skeptical about everything,
so I was very aware that the odds were against me. All I can say now is that my
dreams came true in this regard, so there’s hope for everyone. I feel a little
awkward saying it, as it seems cliché, but it happened for me.

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

I have a website,
and I am on most social media platforms; Instagram, Twitter, and DeviantArt. I also have a
blog on WordPress
– and I usually follow back (with sincere interest). Most of my work is
available as prints and merchandise on RedBubble.

Thank you, Atraxura, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Senta

Today we’re joined by Senta. Senta is a phenomenal illustrator who works mostly in digital mediums. He does enjoy using ballpoint pen on occasion. He has his own style, but can also adapt to a variety of other styles. It’s clear he’s an incredibly passionate artist who loves to create, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to him for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

I
draw, mostly digitally but sometimes I like drawing with ballpoint pen. My
personal style is kind of muted colors and darker settings, but I do lots of
other stuff depending on the vibe I’m trying to show. I take a bit of pride on
the fact that I can cater to people’s interests, that’s especially useful in my
line of work, I’m an illustrator 😉

What inspires you?

People
inspire me, mostly fictional characters to be honest, but I love to draw
people, I love to create characters and create stories for them. I do a lot of
fan art of whatever I’m interested in the moment, or whatever catches my eye.
Sometimes it’s just a photo or something that gives me a vibe for a character
and then I have to draw them.

What got you
interested in your field?  Have you always
wanted to be an artist?

I
honestly don’t know how I started drawing, but I’ve been doing in since I can
remember. I used to draw with chalk on paper when I was a kid cause my
kindergarten didn’t have pencils for all of us. I’ve always wanted to work in
the field, yes, but I wasn’t sure what would I do exactly, I wanted to be a
graphic designer for a long time until I realized what that was and that I
couldn’t really draw much, then I went and studied to be an Illustrator 🙂

Do you have any kind
of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work
that you’d be willing to reveal?

I
sign all my work as Senta, but someday I will come up with a tiny character or
something to hide in all my work, I really want to do that, but I’m not sure
what. I follow at least 3 artists that do that and I loooove it, I love to
search for the little Easter egg in all their art.

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

I’m
not great with advice, but I would say PRACTICE! Practice a lot, and surround
yourself with people and things that inspire you to create. Nice supporting
friends that share your passion for art are truly special, whether is online or
IRL. Also, really practice! Nobody is born knowing how to so stuff, all those
awesome artists that you love? Those people busted their butts off to get
there.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum
do you identify?

I
identify as ace and quasiromantic bi (that label is pretty recent 😉 ) but I
usually go with queer, it’s shorter.

Have you encountered
any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Not
necessarily on my field. I’ve encountered it online, where I post my art, or in
fandoms I make art of, but it’s never about the art itself (thankfully). Either
way I try to let it go and not let it affect me too much. People are ignorant,
a lot of people are, and if I offer some education and they deny it by being
close minded then there’s nothing I can do about it… That said, it does
affect me sometimes, and then I just go and talk to supportive people, I vent a
little and then I usually forget why I was upset in the first place.

What’s the most
common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

I’ve had a lot of “being asexual is basically being
straight”, some “you have to be attracted to someone”, and a few people
invalidating queerplatonic relationships and saying they’re “basically just
friendships”… As I said, ignorant people ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their
orientation?

Look,
I’m the kind of person who loves labels, I looove having a word to explain how
I feel, to know that there’s someone out there who feels the same, so I hate it
when people say “you don’t have to label yourself, just be you”. But as much as
I hate it, they do have a point… cause even if you don’t find a label, it
doesn’t mean you’re alone, there’s so many people in the world I’m 100% sure
there’s at least 50 more people who feel the same.

Specially
in the asexual community, we talk more openly about it being a spectrum, so
it’s hard to find your place in it, and it might even move around, but it’s ok,
take your time. I’d say don’t rush anything, don’t pressure yourself to know
everything, it’s ok not to know. And don’t be afraid to change your mind, that
doesn’t mean you’re fake, you’re just figuring things out, and to be honest, we
all are… Be patient with yourself, be kind, and don’t let anyone define you,
only you can decide your labels (if you decide they’re for you 😉 )

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

I’m
on Tumblr: sentaart (and the-doctor-is-ace is my personal blog) and
Instagram: senta_art

Thank you, Senta, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Celine Chin

Today we’re joined by Celine Chin, who also goes by

Rururinchan. Celine is a phenomenal fanartist from Singapore. She loves to draw her favorite characters and write fics as well. Celine also creates YouTube videos. She also does a bit of original work on the side. Her work is beautiful, brimming with emotion and detail. It’s clear she’s a passionate and dedicated artist, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

My art primarily focuses on things that spark emotion in
both myself and others. I am a fan-artist most of the time, and I love just
drawing my favourite characters, putting them into stories in fanfiction, and
making videos to express how much I love the shows/books/movies etc. I also use
art/writing especially to express myself, often during the more stressful times
as it helps me get through those times a little easier.

What inspires you?

Inspiration and I have a weird relationship. I tend to get
random bursts of inspiration at any given time, sometimes for ideas that are
simple enough, and sometimes the ideas are just so ridiculous and wild it’s hard
to figure out what to do with them. I write most of it down as soon as I can
though, and these little lists I keep are what I would go to first if I need an
idea for content. If not, I like to go on YouTube, and pick videos and music to
watch/listen to based on my artistic mood of the day. Music tends to give me
more inspirational vibes though.

What got you
interested in your field?  Have you
always wanted to be an artist?

Art has been a hobby to me for literally all my life. My
parents tell me that I learned to draw in colourful crayons before I could
speak. I remember being a child and drawing whatever made me happy or sad, and
I was always so proud of them even though my art was not of average kid-quality
back then. I was proud of the fact that I created something myself, and it
never went away, only growing more and more over the years.

Drawing was my primary art form as a kid, then when I got to
my teens, I started trying out more creative art forms, like sewing, baking,
singing and dancing, etc. The one that stuck was writing, as book had become a
major part of my life around then too. Again, that pride of being able to
create something with my own hands was no less than a wonderful feeling. Also,
it was the first time I was creating full stories. It was amazing.

I took media and animation studies in polytechnic after
secondary school, and there my love for video work and photography took off.
Now, I could put my art and my stories to good use in video format. It’s
ridiculously tedious half the time, but the satisfaction at literally watching
all your hard work pay off at the end? It’s the best.

So yes, I’ve always wanted to be in artist, but really, I’ve
been one all along haven’t I? Career or not, art is what brings the most joy to
my life, aside from those close to me of course!

Do you have any kind
of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work
that you’d be willing to reveal?

Not at the moment. I’m working on my name as an artist, and
would love to create my own signature symbol but I’m a little stumped on that
for now as I’m still figuring out what defining feature I would like to
highlight about myself.

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

The best advice I can give is: Please never try to hold
yourself back by making your own expectations too high. I’ve seen many, many
people give up on creativity despite loving it simply because they felt like
their content was never “good enough”, and it’s only harder when they compare
themselves to people around them.

On that note, I’d also like to say that you should never
assume art is something that strictly requires “talent”. Would having a natural
affinity for being creative and good with your hands be useful as an artist? No
doubt it would, I can’t deny that. However, once you firmly decide that
“talent” is a strict requirement and that you may not have that “talent”, it’s
over for you, because once you get into this mindset, everything you do will
never feel “good enough” to you, as you’ll keep feeling that you simply don’t
have the “talent”. It harms your creative self more than you may think, I knew
someone who hated their own art and gave up because they taught they were the
only one in their family without the “natural born artistic talent”, and
despite being fairly decent at their craft, they ultimately gave up because
they resigned themself to believing that they would never do as well as they
didn’t have the “talent”. Also, by believing “talent” is necessary, you
undermine all the hard work artists put into their work. Many spend years and
years and years working on their craft, and trust me when I say that most of
them still think their work isn’t as good as they would’ve liked. But they post
it anyway, because it’s at least “good enough”.

Don’t weigh yourself down with invisible chains. Let
yourself be “okay” instead of “perfect”. You’re only human, let your art
reflect that. Study the art form you want to learn, look up references and helpful
tips, practice and practice.

All artists will hate their art sometimes. Even I stopped
for a while during some darker times in my life, but if you feel that art is
truly something you love, never give up on it, even if nothing BIG ever comes
out of it. If you love it, if it makes you happy in any way, it’s already doing
it’s job for you right.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum
do you identify?

I’m asexual! Still working on the romantic side, but it’s
somewhere on the aro-spectrum. I do find girls at least aesthetically
attractive a lot, so I overall identify as a a sapphic aro-ace person.

Have you encountered
any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Unfortunately yes. I live in Singapore, where anyone that
isn’t gay/lesbian/trans is considered a “weird normal person” (“normal” as in
cishet, it sucks). I’ve tried to include asexuality in my works in school, and
have often received comments about how it was childish, misinformation, or
simply something that didn’t exist. Explanations don’t work when people don’t
want to listen. I’m not free from the prejudice online either. Sometime ago on
Tumblr, I made asexual headcanons for characters that were popularly seen as
gay and pan respectively within the fandom (but were not confirmed in canon)
and got quite a bit of anon hate for it, the comments ranging from how I was
homophobic or how I shouldn’t be “forcing a ace headcanon on young teens since
they aren’t sexual anyway”.

It’s hard to handle, that’s for sure, but in the end it’s
not my job to educate the ignorant. I will support those who do and help to
bring up fellow aces in my community when I can, but the bigoted don’t deserve
my attention as far as I’m concerned. I block them when I can, and move right
on to making more asexual headcanon posts out of spite. As far as I’m
concerned, I’m just here to live my life and exist as a person, not be an
informant for people who refuse to take in any information they’re given
anyway.

What’s the most
common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Definitely the misconception that we hate sex. I myself am a
sex-repulsed ace with a very low sex drive, but it irks me when people assume
we’re all exactly like that. Let asexuals who are open to sex be sexual without
calling them fake aces. Like damn.

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their
orientation?

You might hate it sometimes at first, especially if you’re
younger and/or on the aro-spectrum. With how our society focuses so much on
romance and sex as a requirement of love and happiness, it’s sometimes easy to
fall into a trap that no one will ever love you and that you won’t ever be
happy. Even after you get more comfortable with your sexuality, you still might
feel like that every now and again, even if you’re an allo-romantic ace who’s
fine with sexual intimacy. Just remember that who you’re attracted to, or lack
thereof, doesn’t define who you are. There’s nothing “broken” or “unnatural”
about you for being ace, and I want you to know you’re valid and you and your
sexuality deserve to be respected. There are so many types of love out there,
not just romantic and sexual. Keep those you see as your family close and
treasure them, and don’t let go of your passions and things that bring you joy.
Don’t forget that self-love is important too. If you’re like me, who took a
long time figuring out how to love myself, don’t try to force things, but also
give yourself chances to be proud of the things you’ve done. If you’re an
artist like I am, take pride in your artwork (within reason), and let yourself
be confident in your skills in yourself. You’ll get there. 🙂

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

Tumblr: http://rururincreative.tumblr.com/
(Art Blog)
AO3: https://archiveofourown.org/users/Rururinchan
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCE_pHKt0IeMJVwbjdWtvA0A
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rururinchan/

Thank you, Celine, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Jaime Hawkins

Today we’re joined by Jaime Hawkins. Jaime is a phenomenal visual artist who has a company called Queen Cheetah Designs, which sells enamel pins that she designs. Aside from making enamel pins, Jaime also does quite a lot of fine art. She’s heavily inspired by nature, which shows in her work. It’s clear she’s a driven and passionate artist, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

I graduated with a degree in Graphic Design and Printmaking.
I’ve always loved learning any type of art I could get my hands on – drawing,
painting, digital art – you name it! When I have the time, I enjoy drawing on
my tablet and taking on small freelance design jobs. My biggest endeavor,
however, is my merchandise company Queen Cheetah Designs. Last year the trend
of “Enamel Pins” came back around full force, and I decided to try my hand at
designing some! I started out with moths, and have since branched out to
beetles, spiders, and other nature inspired pins. It makes me really happy to
see my designs come to life as physical merchandise that people like to wear,
and it makes me feel like an accomplished artist! My designs did so well that I
kept making them, and now I have a pretty successful side job running Queen
Cheetah Designs. I hope to branch out in the future to apparel and other merch!

What inspires you?

I think animals and nature have served to be my most
important source of inspiration for my drawing and my merchandise design. It’s
a subject I have always loved, and there is endless beauty and creativity that
can be found in creatures, plants, and our other surroundings. From striking
color palettes to unique patterns, as an artist I feel like I can learn so much
from what already exists in nature, and apply it to my fine art and design
work.

What got you
interested in your field?  Have you
always wanted to be an artist?

From a very young age, I was interested in art. I would
doodle on my homework and draw mash ups of animals to play as during recess. I
took art lessons with another girl at a local framing shop for a few years,
where I learned most of the basics of fine art.

I can’t quite remember how, but “design” specifically caught
my eye around middle school. Packaging design, logo design – I found it all
really fascinating how much thought went into a design and the finished result.
It’s been my driving passion ever since.

Do you have any kind
of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work
that you’d be willing to reveal?

I wish I could say I had a signature style, but that is
something I still struggle with as an artist. I do tend to enjoy drawing
somewhere in between realistic with a fantasy flair thrown in. I’d like to
refine this over the next few years, but developing anything in art takes time
and practice!

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

Drawing – Most of what you create will not be for profit, or
even for other people. There is a lot of pressure nowadays to instantly start
creating and making money, but it’s important to take the time to draw for
yourself. Learn what you like to draw and how you want to draw it. It should be
fun, not something you feel pressured to do. And no matter what level you are
now – just keep going. Practice as often as you can. (DRAW THOSE BACKGROUNDS).
Think of how proud younger you would be of your talent now, and strive to make
them proud.

Making Merchandise/ Pins – It takes more than an idea to be
successful at selling merchandise. It is a tough and tiring job. You have to be
your own manager, designer, PR person, and salesman. Kickstarters are a great
way to fund a potential design, but be careful that you are prepared to handle
the responsibility of ordering your merchandise and fulfilling orders. Don’t
jump into it – take time to plan. But if you feel prepared, it can be a very
rewarding endeavor!

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum
do you identify?

I identify as Asexual, Panromantic.

Have you encountered
any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Relating to the art/ design field specifically? I would say
not really, but then again my art usually doesn’t relate to my sexuality. But
there are plenty of individuals you interact with online who are outspoken with
the fact that they think it’s “not real” or that “we’ve just had bad
experiences”. I try to educate where I can, and when it seems like the people
might be receptive. A lot of ideas about asexuality spring from ignorance. Some
folks just don’t want to understand though, and sometimes you just have to
brush it off and move on. Find solace with others who share your experiences.

What’s the most
common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That all asexual people are sex repulsed, and hate all types
of physical contact. I’m what you would call a sex apathetic asexual. I have no
interest in it, and have no desire to seek it out, but it doesn’t bother me.
It’s a light switch that stays off.

It does become a problem when I desire other attention from
partners that traditionally leads to sex. Like making out, or cuddling – it’s
either all or nothing. This leads to a very frustrated ace that doesn’t feel
cherished but feels hypocritical asking for more physical contact “as an ace
person”.

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Asexuality is a spectrum, and everyone experiences it in
their own way. Being Ace is really hard at times, especially when it comes to
finding a partner. It is important to find someone who respects your comfort
levels and communicates with you to find out how to approach that part of your
relationship. It’s tempting to push your own comfort levels aside to make them
happy, because it may make you feel desired – but it will breed resentment in
time if there is no respect for your likes and dislikes as well. For people
like us it is especially important to make friends and not rely entirely on
having a partner to feel fulfilled.

If you find someone, make sure they love you AS someone who
is asexual, not DESPITE the fact you are asexual.

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

You can find all my enamel pins and current merchandise on
my Etsy shop -> https://www.etsy.com/shop/QueenCheetahDesigns.
You can also follow me on Twitter at Jaime_Hawkins
or on Instagram under Jaime_Hawkins_Design
to stay up to date on my art and any upcoming designs.

Thank you so much!

Thank you, Jaime, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Rachel

Today we’re joined by Rachel. Rachel is a phenomenal artist who does a bit of everything. She writes both fanfiction and original work. She does a fair amount of visual art, mostly drawing using a variety of mediums. As if that’s not impressive enough, Rachel has also done quite a lot of work in theater, both on stage and behind the scenes. It’s clear she’s an extraordinarily talented and passionate individual, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

I do a ton of art! I write original stories and fanfiction
for a variety of genres. I draw, mostly in the traditional sense, and I have a
background in theater where I performed, directed, stage managed, was a set
designer and constructor for anywhere around 12 productions.

What inspires you?

I am inspires by many things. My drawings are often spur of
the moment. They could be inspired by fandom and I’ll create fan art, or be
very whimsical and I’ll create some sort of abstract painting.

My writing is often angsty or very light and touching (there’s
not much in between most of the time, haha). Fanfiction is inspired by the
movie Rise of the Guardians, Spider-Man and Deadpool and occasionally Supernatural!
I hope to have more content for these fandoms in the future, and maybe other
fandoms, but I have been focusing a little bit more on my original content. I
write short stories that are fiction or real-life event inspired. I also have
some poem(ish) writing and I’m working on developing my voice. I never want to
stick to just one genre because I find so much expression in several forms of
writing.

What got you
interested in your field?  Have you
always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve been drawing since I’ve learned to hold a crayon.
Writing I’ve always loved and have wanted to create more of. I love reading and
when I discovered fanfic, it was an instant attraction. In recent years, I’ve
decided I’d like to make publishing a novel one of my life goals.

Do
you have any kind of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you
include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Honestly no, because my style is always changing and taking
on new forms. From paint to markers to pencils to charcoal to fiction to poems
I’m always shaking it up.

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

Do it! Do it over and over again and take pictures of the
work you draw because one day you can look at an old picture and compare it to
your growth and see where you’ve come from and where you are now!

And write of course! Write anything. Your thoughts, your
dreams, your observations, your ideas, write it all! Drown in your words. And
remember you don’t have to write in order. Sometimes, writing the beginning is
so hard, so write that middle part! Write down that action scene and big plot
twist and get it out of your head to clear the clutter. Fill in the holes later
after you get that burning inspiration to write that one scene because the rest
might become easier after doing that.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum
do you identify?

I identify as a cis gendered female with she/her pronouns
and panromantic asexual.

Have you encountered
any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Absolutely, I had a long term relationship end because I
began to ID as ace. My parents don’t fully understand my sexuality and I come
across it in social media a lot. I just remind myself that I am valid, I’m not
alone, I have support from friends, and that I can get through peoples ignorance
because I know who I am.

What’s the most
common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

I have been called a plant (as in I will only reproduce with
myself, which never made sense) and that I’m prude. I’ve also been told that I
just “haven’t met the right person” which is to say I’ll feel sexual desire and
attraction when the right person comes into my life.

I’m not a late bloomer. I’m ace, and that’s okay.

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their
orientation?

Don’t let other peoples judgement and opinions weigh you
down. Seek allies. We’re out here and you are a valid, wonderful and a real
person. You are not broken.

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

Oh! Look me up! On…

Tumblr: FrostedDragonHeart
(Eternal Believer) and wrayghtings
(Endless Words)
Fanfiction.net: FrostedDragonHeart
Fictionpress.com: FrostedDragonHeart
Instagram: rachelart_s

I accept DM/PMs on all of these so please feel free to chat
with me!

Thank you, Rachel, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Faith

Today we’re joined by Faith. Faith is a wonderful artist who does a bit of everything. She paints, writes, sings, plays instruments, and draws. She’s most passionate about dancing. Faith loves to dance. It’s clear she’s a passionate and talented artist, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

I do a large variety of different art forms such as dance,
singing, acting, instruments, drawing, painting, and more. I think the one that
I’ve focused on the most would be dance. Dance has been one of those things
that I started super young, 5 years old, and I have continued to do for so many
years. It is like a safe haven for me.
It is a way for me to let go of the world around me and just let my
emotions out. I honestly can’t imagine my life without it.

What inspires you?

Nature and emotions inspire me mostly. I guess some
combination of the two. I always feel so at peace outside in nature, as cheesy
as it sounds, watching a cloud roll by or the rays of the sun through the
trees. A lot of my movement comes from watching a river flow or a leaf caught
in the wind. Surprisingly or not so surprisingly rain and puddles are where I
find some of my most interesting ideas. Nature is never stagnate, and there is
a lot to be found in the ever changing world.

As for emotions, there are such hidden depths to every
single person out there. The raw emotions people don’t normally see are such an
interesting thing to experience or choreograph with. Music choice works
extremely well with this too, as music is supposed to evoke feelings. A slow
dramatic piece could work with feelings of longing or sorrow while an uplifting
song could focus on joy or peace.

What got you
interested in your field?  Have you
always wanted to be an artist?

Kind of embarrassing but the Barbie movie the Nutcracker is
what got me started dancing. I realize now that the dancing on there is very
bad but hey, I was 5. At the time I thought it was the best thing I had ever
seen and I have been hooked on art ever since. This obviously snowballed into
so many different types of arts like music, visual, performing, to the point of
I can’t imagine my life without art. It is so integral to who I am that I have
never imagined being anything other than an artist.

Do you have any kind
of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work
that you’d be willing to reveal?

I don’t have one specific thing that occurs in all of my
dances. I guess one of the most common things that occurs would be using music
from movie, TV, or video game soundtracks but I wouldn’t really call that a
unique signature. I’m just a huge geek!

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

Don’t let anyone bring you down. You don’t become a prima
ballerina overnight and you will fall down. Nobody is perfect and we have to
accept that. One of the biggest things I see when people start dancing is being
constantly being discouraged by corrections or criticism. The best thing you
can do is take the corrections and learn from them. You will grow as a dancer,
an artist, and a person. You have to remember that everyone started where you
are now, and they used hard work and dedication to achieve their dreams. “Life
isn’t about waiting for the storm to pass. It’s about learning to dance in the
rain.”

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum
do you identify?

I believe I am asexual and heteroromantic. I’m not entirely
sure about the romantic side of me, I may be demiromantic, but I am definitely
positive that I am asexual. I haven’t been in many situations where I can
explore my sexuality further but that may just be because I generally avoid
situations where people can give me romantic interest.

Have you encountered
any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I haven’t really found that much prejudice is my field
mainly because it is rarely talked about. That and most people I talk to don’t
really know that much about asexuality. The main issue I have found is just the
heteronormality and hypersexualized nature in the world. There are many dances
that I have been in where the dance is fun until the choreographer decides to
add in a sexualized section in order to draw the crowd in. It makes me
uncomfortable to watch or perform and it is normally unnecessary.

I will say that where I perform, homosexual relationships
are represented and choreographed which is quite refreshing. But there is no
asexual representation.

What’s the most
common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That either we don’t exist or that people automatically
assume that asexual people are all sex repulsed. I know that many of us don’t
want sex, don’t like sex, or are even repulsed by it but there is a large
amount of us who don’t mind sex. I don’t know where I fall on the whole sex
spectrum but I do have an asexual friend who rants to me about the topic. She
says that she enjoys the act of sex even if she isn’t sexually attracted to
someone.

I guess another misconception that I have seen is that
people would think that asexuality is just a low sex drive. An imbalance in
chemicals. That it can be “fixed.” Asexuality is an orientation just like any
other sexuality. There is nothing wrong with it nor is there anything wrong
with an asexual person.

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their
orientation?

Have a good support system. One of the things that has
helped me the most with my sexuality would be having people who understand and
respect me. It has helped cure my insecurities and accept who I am.

Just remember that you
are not alone.
There are so many of us out there in the world who have been
exactly where you are now. You are not broken. You are not weird or wrong or
even a freak. There are people out there that can support you and that do
accept you. There is more love for asexuals than hate. Focus on that.

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

I don’t post a lot of my work online but I do have some on
my Instagram account. It is a private account so if you want to see anything
just DM me and tell me you saw this post and I’ll let you follow me! At kitten0981.

Thank you, Faith, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Amy Valentine

Today we’re joined by Amy Valentine. Amy is a phenomenal visual artist who does a lot of art journaling. She uses mostly colored pencils, watercolors, and various markers. She’s also an art student, so she works in a variety of mediums. When she’s not creating visual art, Amy also writes quite a bit of fanfiction. It’s clear she is a dedicated and passionate artist with a very bright future ahead of her. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

On my free time, I do a lot of art journaling,
which is basically having a sketchbook expect I put more effort in decorating
the pages to fit with my current mood. I also enjoy writing, mostly
fanfictions, but I’m very eager to write something of my own someday.

I’m also an art student, so at school I also do
paintings, photography and whatever else, and hopefully after school I could
practice painting at home, too.

For art journaling, I like to use watercolors,
color pencils and different kind of markers. Sometimes I just glue things in.

What inspires you?

Music is a big inspiration for me, because I’m
almost always wearing headphones. I also get a lot of ideas from movies – When
there is a scene that is just so pretty to look at, I always want to draw my
own version of it.

I also take a lot of inspiration from my own
feelings, since art journaling is kind of something that you do to express your
emotions.

I also draw a lot of women’s nude bodies as a way
to start learning to love my own body, so I guess they also give me
inspiration. Don’t know what to draw? I’ll draw a torso. The headless statue of
a woman is always there to save me from art block.

What got you
interested in your field?  Have you
always wanted to be an artist?

Yes, definitely. As a kid, I loved drawing comics
and other cute things. I was really into manga back then. I would always be
sketching at the edge of the test paper, even if the teacher told me not to.

At school, we also wrote a lot of our own stories,
and I was always told that the stories I wrote were good and unique, so I got
more inspired to write every day. I guess I can safely say I have always wanted
to be an artist/writer. At this moment, I think I’d want to be a writer more
than an artist.

Do you have any kind
of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work
that you’d be willing to reveal?

At the moment, I don’t think I yet have my own
style or my own unique thing. In art, I’m still figuring out what I want to
create and what kind of a style fits me the most. In writing, I’m trying to
experiment a little to see what kind of stuff I want to write and how. So, for
now, no unique signatures or anything.

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

Practice, practice and practice. And do not
compare yourself to others. I did that and only felt worse about my skills. The
first 6 months at art school were rough because I kept thinking everyone else
was better than me. But when I learned to just focus on my own work and did my
best, my drawings ended up looking a lot better. So just don’t give up. We’re
all at different skill levels here, so just focus working on your own thing.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum
do you identify?

I’d say I’m somewhere between being a demisexual
and asexual.

I did just find the term ‘aegosexual’ that fits me
quite well, but, I’m still trying to figure myself out. And that’s okay.

Have you encountered
any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

When I told my parents, both of them were confused
but supportive, thankfully. Before I tried to get into art school, I told my
school nurse that I felt like I was close to an asexual, and they said to me ‘I
WILL find the right one’, and if I wouldn’t, I should seek medical help. I also
told my friends that I was in the ace spectrum, and they said that wasn’t
possible.

I’ve also been in two relationships before and in
both of them I felt like being asexual was wrong. I felt like saying ‘no’ to
sex was wrong, and that was used against me. I’m still healing from that.

I think the best way to handle any kind of
prejudice is to know that you aren’t broken, and that there is nothing wrong
with you. Also, calmly explaining to them what asexuality is can help them
understand it better. And honestly, never, EVER, do something that feels
uncomfortable to you just so you could please someone else. Listen to your own
feelings.

What’s the most
common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Probably the one where they think that if I’m in
the ace spectrum, I can’t feel any kind of sexual pleasure, or that I can’t
have sex, or that I can’t include sex scenes in my writing, and so on. Asexuals
aren’t 100% sexless – some can be, but some asexuals are okay with having sex
for their partner, and some asexuals masturbate. Some people don’t seem to get
that.

The other misconception is people thinking
asexuals can’t experience romantic feelings. And the third one that my school
nurse one suggested – that being asexual meant you were afraid of sex.

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their
orientation?

It’s OK to not be sure where in the ace spectrum
you are, and it’s OK to change labels later on, and it’s OK if you’re still
searching for yourself. Just know that there is no rush. You are what you are,
and even if you aren’t 100% sure what your label is, then that’s alright. You
don’t have to put yourself into a box if you’re not ready yet. Just take your
time with your inner self, love yourself.

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

Tumblr: https://paper-star-fight.tumblr.com/
AO3: https://archiveofourown.org/users/ValentineRunaway

Thank you, Amy, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Ray Wyse

Today we’re joined by Ray Wyse. Ray is a phenomenal visual artist and writer. They mostly write fanfiction but hope to publish some original work in the future. Aside from writing, they are also a dedicated visual artist who enjoys drawing and painting. They do a lot of portraiture work and their art is extraordinarily detailed. It’s clear they’re a passionate and talented artist, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to them for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

My work varies, but I enjoy writing, drawing and painting.
My writing is most often fictional pieces with characters I’ve created, and
while I try and branch out with my artwork my strongest pieces have always been
portraiture. In all my work I try and integrate what I know, in terms of my
experiences and imagination. I’ll mainly referencing my artwork in this
interview as it’s what most of my time and my education is dedicated to!

What inspires you?

Other people inspire me. I’m driven by seeing creators do
what they love and doing it well, it really pushes me to try and be better.

But for choosing what I want to draw or paint I’m inspired
by perception. I find drawing exactly what I can see boring, and I want to
explore more emotive ways of portraying people and places. Usually this means
playing with the features of the subject matter, taking them away or changing
them through distortion or obstruction.

What got you
interested in your field?  Have you
always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve always wanted to create art. I’ve taken it at every
level available to me through primary and secondary school, but it’s only
recently at college I became determined to find some sort of career in it. I
think most of our everyday life is the way it is because of artistic people,
from film to advertising to product design, and yet it goes by unnoticed.
Almost every field has a need for us, and when I realized that it only helped
push my interest in the subject.

Do you have any kind
of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work
that you’d be willing to reveal?

I don’t really? There are maybe certain things I always do
that I’m not aware of, but as someone who’s still trying to find their own
style and techniques I don’t think I have any repetitive patterns, but I
suppose I always draw specific attention to the eyes or the obstruction of
them. I feel like that makes or breaks a good portrait.

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

I would say that I know, I understand it’s frustrating
sometimes. There will always be others that are around your age, who you think
has work that surpasses your own. There will be times where you can’t get a
picture JUST right. But you have to realize that your art is always changing
and improving. It’s hard to notice day to day but try and redo a piece from
just a few years or even months ago to see how you’ve changed! Practice, there
isn’t a shortcut to progress! Support and learn from each other!

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum
do you identify?

I identify as asexual, but I don’t know where on the
spectrum. I’m in a serious relationship, but I haven’t been for long enough to
know whether or not I could be demi. Currently I identify as a panromantic ace,
meaning I can have romantic attraction to any gender but sexual attraction to
none.

Have you encountered
any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I generally encounter confusion when talking to someone
about my sexuality. It’s difficult, because as someone who didn’t find a label
that worked for them until their late teens, I spent a lot of my childhood
thinking I was ‘broken’ or otherwise ‘wrong’. And hearing it insinuated from someone
else saying ‘how do you know? Maybe you just haven’t found the right person,
etc. etc.’ can hurt a lot. Especially if coming from other people in the LGBT+
community.

But I have to remember I’m valid, and that’s what I tell
them. I calmly explain that I just don’t feel sexual attraction, I never have,
and it really isn’t a big concern. And if they don’t accept that, I stop
conversing with them.

What’s the most
common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

The most common misconception is that asexuality is
comparable to practicing abstinence, as if sexuality is some sort of choice.
Another common one is that all ace people ‘become’ asexual after some sort of
traumatic experience

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their
orientation?

I would say it’s not your job to educate others, and it’s
okay to not have everything figured out! You’ll hear about how it’s a ‘phase’
at some point in your life, and this will suck. But remember that no matter
what, whether how you identify changes over the years or if a label you found
at 13 still works for you at 33, you’re valid.

I’m not going to tell you it isn’t a phase and you won’t
experience doubts. I’m going to tell you that if it is, that’s okay too.

Take time figuring yourself out, research the spectrum of
different sexualities, and don’t feel bad if things change. How you identify at
this moment is still 100% valid and don’t settle for anyone that doesn’t
respect that.

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

You can find more of my work on Instagram! I also do
commissions; my username is at Rachel.Wyse
<3

I’m hoping to branch into other social media sites soon, but
for now the majority of my work is on Instagram.

Thank you, Ray, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: E.T.Vise

Today we’re joined by E.T.Vise. E.T.Vise is a wonderful visual artist who specializes in 2D cartoons and photography. He has recently gotten into filmmaking and is exploring that medium as well. It’s clear they’re a passionate and enthusiastic artist, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to him for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

I primarily do 2D cartoon and pen art but I do go into
photography and I’m starting to get into Filmmaking and the art of
filmmaking.  

What inspires you?

The world around us and how our brains are built with what
we feel & think.

What got you
interested in your field?  Have you
always wanted to be an artist?

Wanting to create something that said me and just the influx
ideas for art.

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

Make whatever the hell you want to make, grab a pencil and
paper and experiment and find your creative voice.

ASEXUALITY

Have you encountered
any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

No… not really that and I haven’t really been active in the
community but I’m sure as I become more active the situation will arise one
day.

What’s the most
common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That we don’t have any physical interaction (cuddling,
holding hands kissing etc.). I’ve had to tell people so many times “no it’s
just sexual things”

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their
orientation?

Embrace it and just know that this doesn’t affect who you
are as a person.

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

You can find more of my work on my YouTube Channel: E T V,
(and while there’s not much there right now a big project of mine is coming
soon so be on the lookout for that.)

Also my Twitter ETVtwutter
and my Instagram etvinstagrem
and my Tumblr, apersonwholikestodraw.  

Thank you, E.T.Vise, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.