Category: drawing

church-of-goatbunny: Alright, everyone… the go…

church-of-goatbunny:

Alright, everyone… the goatbunny tarot is FINALLY done.

-78 cards based on my original watercolors.

-The cards are about 2.75 x 5.25" a bit longer and narrower than standard tarot cards).

-The backs of the cards are a pearlescent cardstock and the fronts are matte (which means I’m gluing them togther, but it makes for a sturdier card!)

-They come with a booklet of the meanings (upright and reversed)

-It’s all packaged in a tuck box in the same pearlescent cardstock.

-Everything is hand assembled so I’m making every deck on demand.

They’re $70 USD till the end of the month, then they’ll be $80 and up in my shop. As for now, you can DM me to order. I’ve factored shipping within North America in the price. Extra cost for International!

I’m so excited to finally share this with you guys!!! 🖤💚🖤💚🖤💚🖤💚

Interview: Ellison

Today we’re joined by Ellison. Ellison is a phenomenal actress and an aspiring writer. She writes mainly poetry and short stories and hopes to be published one day. When she’s not acting or writing, Ellison enjoys to work on her visual art. She draws and sketches frequently. It’s clear she’s a dedicated artist who really loves to create. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

I dabble in lots of art forms, but mainly pursue theater,
writing (poetry and short stories), and drawing. I’ve been in multiple
productions, most recently A Midsummer
Night’s Dream
and will be playing Penny in You Can’t Take It With You this fall. If you’d like to contact me
about doodles, sketches, poems, or stories, please contact me directly on my
Tumblr:   wellnoduhofcourceimafangirl.

What inspires you?

I get a lot of my inspiration from my past and experiences
I’ve had, a lot of which were bad. I also take motivation from close friends
and one that not many people seem to talk about, but the media I consume. I
read all the time, almost always fiction. In a well written book there might be
a storyline that inspires me or the way something is described, I just have to
sketch it out.

What got you
interested in your field?  Have you
always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve always loved art, in some form or another and I’ve been
a performer, or depending on who you ask, a drama queen, as long as I can
remember. I wanted to be an artist but not until high school did I actually
think about making a career out of it. Little kid me would’ve been okay with
princess, but really wanted to be a spy. Currently I’d go for taking deep
breaths and making it through the day because the future is big and loud. As a
career, I think I’d be most likely to pursue my writing.

Do you have any kind
of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work
that you’d be willing to reveal?

I don’t, I’m pretty boring. Though, now that I’m thinking
about it, I should totally come up with one. I’m always willing to listen to
suggestions.

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

No matter your art form, never stop. Ever. If you practice
your art every day, you’re an artist. If you only practice one a year, you’re
still an artist. I’ve been at an art school for over two years and I still
invalidate myself as an artist. You’re not an imposter, you are good enough. And if anyone tells you
otherwise, contact me for a hug plus I’ll fight them.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum
do you identify?

Currently I identify as asexual but I’m still trying to
figure myself out. One of the biggest problems I’ve had is feeling like it is
just a phase, or maybe I am just doing for attention. I still struggle with
that. It’s okay if you try on labels to see what fits you. It doesn’t make you
a liar or an imposter. All I really have to do now is figure out how to take my
own advice.

Have you encountered
any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I haven’t. I hear the stories about acephobia and I haven’t
experienced any yet and I have to remind myself that everyone’s experiences are
different, and that doesn’t make you wrong.

What’s the most
common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That Aces can’t have or don’t like sex. It’s not about
whether we enjoy, or even have sex. It’s not about sex drive, nor about whether
we think someone is beautiful or hot. We just don’t experience sexual
attraction. That’s it.

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their
orientation?

Talk to people that understand. Talk to people who love you
regardless of how you identify. Try as hard as you can to love yourself and
remember that it isn’t anyways easy. Remember you aren’t alone. You will find
love as you are, whether it’s physical or romantic or platonic or familial or
self-love. You’re amazing.

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

To see my work or ask about commissions, contact me at my
Tumblr:    wellnoduhofcourceimafangirl.

Thank you, Ellison, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: goatbunny

Today we’re joined by goatbunny. goatbunny is a phenomenal visual artist who works in a number of different mediums, both traditional and digital. goatbunny has done shows in the past and has a number of different projects they’re currently working on, including creating her own Tarot Deck. It’s clear she’s a passionate and driven artist, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

I
paint and draw using both traditional (pencil, ink, watercolor and illustration
marker are my main tools, but I also use gouache, acrylic, spray paint,
crayons, and pretty much anything else I find) and digital media (I’ve
recently gotten back into digital media so I’ve
been exploring more of that). I dabble in almost everything else, I’ll
try anything once. I’ve sculpted in the past, and I sew a
lot when I don’t really feel like drawing or
painting, by hand and with a machine. I am currently creating my own Tarot Deck
and collaborating with a fellow artist on a card game, activity/coloring books
and I have started to experiment more with non-traditional styles of animation
with him using “2-D”
type of puppets using cardboard and even felt. I have recently created my
second short film.

What inspires you?

I
try to gain inspiration from everything around me. I try not to focus too much
on other visual artists like myself as I try to avoid the trap of having other
drawing styles impacting my own too heavily. I am very inspired by music,
films, books, etc. I just try to be as observant as possible. Meeting up with
other creatives also helps a lot. I have a lot of musicians and artists, and a
couple of writers in my friend circle so I like to think we inspire each other.

What got you
interested in your field?  Have you
always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve
pretty much been drawing and creating since I was able to hold a pencil in my
hand. I have always loved cartoons, comics, animated film and even videogames
and had always wanted to be an animator, cartoonist, illustrator or character
designer when I was younger. I HAVE always wanted to be in a creative field,
even if I was steered in other directions. Even when I was studying the
sciences in school or during my short career in the medical field, I never
stopped drawing and now I can finally say that art is what I do full time.

Do you have any kind
of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work
that you’d be willing to reveal?

I
can’t say that I really have a unique
signature, aside from signing “Goat”
when I do remember to sign my pieces. Lately I have been watermarking any
pieces I have posted publicly online, and have also been incorporating my
Goatagram logo in digital work (It’s
basically a pentagram with a goatbunny head – a bunny with goat horns).

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

Just
keep creating. Even if you don’t end up being a full-time artist,
always make time for art. It’s not the easiest career choice. I’m
35 and have only been a full-time artist for the past 3 years, so I can feel
the difference, financially. I almost want to say my parents were right and
that you should find a steady, well-paying job but to be honest, I traded said
job for the sake of my mental health and I can say that, for the most part, it
was worth it.

If
you do choose art as a career, you may feel discouraged. You may feel like you
want to quit. You may even become disgruntled about what you see in the art
world. It’s important to remember why you create
and why it’s important to YOU. It also helps to
have a close, supportive network to help you through any of the rough patches
you may hit.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum
do you identify?

I
feel like I discovered asexuality waaaaay late in the game (early-30s) so I
found it really difficult to figure out where I fall in the spectrum. In
retrospect, I feel like I could be a grey-ace but it’s
hard to really tell what I really felt and what I thought I SHOULD feel. So I
generally just use the more general asexual term because I am at least certain
about that.

Have you encountered
any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

It’s
hard to say as I tend to keep my personal life out of my work for the most
part. My city has a large LGBTQ+ community, and a large arts community and they
both overlap. I have been invited to fairs run by queer artists through a
mutual friend but I feel like ace representation wasn’t
strong on there at all. The community feels very overtly sex favorable, and
most art is very inundated with social commentary, especially about sexuality,
gender and orientation. It even felt like there was even a certain “dress
code”. Since my art doesn’t
have any specific themes about gender or sexuality, didn’t
“look”
like them, and am cis in relationship with someone of the opposite sex, I didn’t
feel very
welcome. Not to say that I wasn’t, but I didn’t
feel very included by some of the merchants/organizers. I’m
not entirely sure if that counts, but it felt like if I didn’t
openly express my sexuality or orientation, I don’t
really count or am truly accepted. I tend to not let situations like that get
to me since I want people to relate to and judge my art, not who I am.

What’s the most
common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Of
the few people I came out to and had to explain it, the main misconception was
basically that I just don’t like sex. In the case of my husband
before we were married, he thought it meant that I didn’t/couldn’t
love him or didn’t want to have sex with him. After
having explained it a few times, he finally understood that I am capable of
love, but sexual attraction
is something I don’t experience. I’ve
come to realize that for a lot of people, it is very difficult to separate
sexual attraction, romantic attraction, love and the act of sex itself.

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their
orientation?

That
one’s tough, since I feel like I’m
still learning a lot about my own every day. I guess: Keep reading up on it. Do
some introspection. Be open to what you learn. Accept the fact that your
orientation may change. Just learn to accept who you and what you’re
going through at the moment. Finding community among others who accept and
support who you are and what you are experiencing will also help, whether it’s
in real life or online.

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

My Tumblr is http://www.church-of-goatbunny.tumblr.com/
And Facebook page is https://www.facebook.com/churchofgoatbunny/,
but it’s mostly just posts shared from my
Instagram: at winner.gets.a.rake.
I
do have a Patreon which is a huge help for self-employed artists: https://www.patreon.com/goatbunny
Work can be purchased directly through me or my Big Cartel shop: https://churchofgoatbunny.bigcartel.com/

Thank you, goatbunny, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Morgan

Today we’re joined by Morgan. Morgan is a phenomenal artist who is currently studying to become a fashion designer. When they’re not studying, Morgan cosplays as a hobby and they also draw as well. It’s clear they’re an incredibly talented and dedicated artist with a very bright future ahead of them, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to them for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

I am
studying to be a fashion designer and also cosplay and draw casually. I have
various designs as well as cosplays and art pieces.

What inspires you?

As a
cosplayer and artist, I am influenced by shows and characters I love and feel
passionate about. For original art and designs I am inspired by issues I care
about as well as interpretations of my environment and my own feelings. My
gender identity and sexuality also inspire my art.

What got you
interested in your field?  Have you
always wanted to be an artist?

I
was always interested in drawing, especially nature and humans. My passion and
creativity extended to my self-expression through clothing and led me to create
my own clothing.

Do you have any kind
of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work
that you’d be willing to reveal?

Not
necessarily. When I start to have more clothing designs that I have made and
created I plan to name my brand after my grandmother’s last name, because she
has always supported my art and all aspects of my identity.

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

Explore
different ways of expressing your creativity and don’t limit yourself to one
media. Even if you aren’t as experienced or skilled in other areas, trying
different methods opens new ways to interpret your feelings and your art.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum
do you identify?

I am
asexual and sex-repulsed.

Have you encountered any
kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Not
yet. Though I feel as though some of my family/friends doesn’t understand why
some of my art/designs are more revealing or “sexual” in nature when I myself
am not sexual.

What’s the most
common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That
being asexual (and/or sex repulsed) means you think sex and people who have sex
are dirty/wrong. I believe sex is a very natural thing and if all parties
concerned are happy and consenting, then that’s great. Do what makes you happy.
Just because there are people who aren’t into it doesn’t mean they are against
it.

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their
orientation?

Even
if you are worried that you might change your mind in the future or that you
should be sexually attracted to others, remember that your feelings and
identity NOW are valid, no matter what you have felt in the past or could
potentially feel in the future.

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

I
have an art Tumblr under the URL mmmdraws and a cosplay Tumblr with
the URL maeroncosplays. I also post a lot of my
cosplay/cosplay progress on my Instagram irish.i.was.dead. My clothing design Instagram is morrisroe_designs though I haven’t posted a whole lot on there yet.

Thank you, Morgan, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Alex

Today we’re joined by Alex. Alex is a wonderful artist who is a bit of a jack of all trades. He does a lot of visual art, mostly drawing and painting. He also does crafts and enjoys knitting and crochet, particularly long scarves. When he’s not doing crafts or visual art, Alex also makes music and can play the ukulele. It’s clear he’s a passionate artist who enjoys what he does. My thanks to him for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

I use my art to create things I think the world is missing,
whether it’s music, or extra-large scarves, or just a painting.  My art is my outlet, it’s diverse and
powerful (even when it’s just for me) and it enables me to express myself.

What inspires you?

The ability to create, to bring something into this world
that causes emotion.  When I knit or
crochet I am, more often than not, creating a gift to give to someone
else.  When I play my ukulele I hope that
someone listening can feel the emotions of the music.  I am inspired by the ability to make
something that was once missing from the world.

What got you
interested in your field?  Have you
always wanted to be an artist?

I had a friend in elementary school who inspired me to
create comics.  They were just stick
figures, but I had so much fun coming up with jokes and stories, that even when
I stopped creating comics I continued to draw.

At the same time, my family has always been very musical and
so, when my nana let me play her ukulele I decided I wanted have one too.

Do you have any kind
of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work
that you’d be willing to reveal?

Ah, no haha, I’m too inconsistent to do something that clever.

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

At times it may seem tough, but art is an outlet, it doesn’t
matter if you think it’s good if you enjoy it.
What matters is if you feel good while creating whatever it is you are
making.  Improvement will come with
practice, for now, just enjoy the ride.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum
do you identify?

I identify as asexual and do not use the split attraction
model (SAM).

Have you encountered
any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I’m rather isolated, and I do not bring up my asexuality
unless it is with people I trust, so as of current, I have not experienced any
prejudice from my fellow artists.

What’s the most
common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That asexual means you don’t like sex.  Which is false, different people have
different views on sex and just because I experience so sexual attraction does
not mean that I have no libido or interest.
But like I said, it’s different for everyone.

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their
orientation?

If you decide one that that you are not ace, that’s OK.  If you live your whole life never subscribing
to a label, that’s OK.  What matters is
your comfort and that others respect you.
I thought I was a lesbian when I was younger because if I didn’t like
guys I must have to like girls then right? But I allowed myself space to grow
and now I know I am trans and asexual.
There is always room to grow and explore, so don’t feel stuck with one
label.

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

My music is available here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLHiHayKl58aLduLbGJShFw
And my art can be found here: Lukassskywalker.tumblr.com/tagged/my+art
And I have some things posted on RedBubble :D: https://www.redbubble.com/people/slothguard?asc=u.

Thank you, Alex, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Embo

Today we’re joined by Embo. Embo is a phenomenal artist who specializes in cross stitch. She has recently cross stitched a number of Pride badges, which are absolutely beautiful. Embo also does some embroidery and she has recently started dabbling in drawing as well. It’s clear she’s a driven and passionate artist who loves to create, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

I mostly
cross stitch, sometimes embroider, and occasionally draw. Cross stitching is my
main art though. I favour working on smaller pieces, and recently I’ve spent
most of my time making small Pride pieces.

As for
drawing, I’ve taken up doodling fan art of Mass
Effect
with the intention of writing fan fic in the future.

What inspires you?

I follow
many talented people on Tumblr, and seeing their work inspires me greatly! If I
see someone has created a wonderful piece of art, I find it spurs me into
action and I will immediately start trying to create something of my own.
Drawing is more accessible for me, but I can’t resist taking on new cross
stitch projects, to the detriment of older forgotten WIPs!

What got you
interested in your field?  Have you
always wanted to be an artist?

Admittedly
my reasons for getting interested into cross stitch aren’t very inspiring. I
kept seeing subversive cross stitch popping up online and thought it was really
funny and wanted to get into that. As soon as I started though, I realised that
cross stitch is an amazing craft, really fun, and especially good for stress
relief! And to this day, I’ve only produced one piece of subversive cross
stitch haha.

I started
as a fan artist when I was younger, but found that no matter how hard I tried,
I was never satisfied with my drawings. Cross stitch, however, has always been
really satisfying.

Do you have any kind
of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work
that you’d be willing to reveal?

To be
honest, not really. I still haven’t gotten into the habit of signing my cross
stitch pieces, which is something I really ought to get into doing. I used to
sign my drawings, but I dropped the habit some years ago when I stopped being
happy with what I was making.

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

Don’t get
bogged down in getting lots of Likes on social media. Be proud of what you’re
making, and don’t stress about what other people think.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum
do you identify?

Somewhere
between ace and demisexual. Possibly panromantic and demiromantic too, but I’m
still figuring that part out.

Have you encountered
any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

The worst
I’ve encountered was coming out to a family member and being told that I just
hadn’t met the right person yet. This was frustrating, as talking about my
asexuality has always been hard in the first place, and I felt like I was being
shut down. In response, I just never brought it up with them again. Nowadays I
rarely come out, unless it’s necessary for the situation. This… is not a great
way to be. I shouldn’t have to feel the need to hide this aspect of myself, but
the fear of prejudice tends to take me over a lot. I’ve also had to quit
visiting some “LGBT-friendly” websites outright, because the audience was
completely acephobic. I realised that I just wasn’t welcome there, which was a
shame because I otherwise enjoyed the site. I… was angry and sad for days
afterwards. It’s not an easy thing to process.

What’s the most
common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That we’re
all a bunch of prudes. Or that we’re just trying to make ourselves out to be
special for something that isn’t even a thing. I also worry that, because I’m
in a relationship, people think I’m not ace anymore which… is not how that
works at all.

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their
orientation?

Don’t be
afraid to embrace yourself! Labels can be greatly helpful, but use them
carefully- don’t cling to them completely. You’re 100% valid in who are, and
don’t let anyone take that from you. And don’t worry if you find your labels
change over time. Mine did, and I had nobody to talk to about it at the time,
but don’t worry if that happens to you, it does not make you any less valid!

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

I post
cross stitch and embroidery at http://stickyfigs.tumblr.com/ and doodlings at https://potatopotholeakastickyfigs.tumblr.com/.

Thank you, Embo, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Minerva Cerridwen

Today we’re joined by Minerva Cerridwen. Minerva is a phenomenal SFF author and visual artist. For writing, she has a story published in Unburied Fables and recently released her novella, The Dragon of Ynys (which features an aro-ace main character). Visual art is more of a hobby for her, though she does do commissions. Minerva does handlettering and draws, using traditional mediums such as pencils and ink. It’s clear she’s a very passionate and dedicated artist, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

I’ve always
loved writing, and to my great joy I can call myself a published author these
days. I mainly write fantasy and science fiction and sometimes dabble in poetry
and horror. So far I’ve got a short story in the queer fairy tale anthology Unburied Fables and my debut novella, The Dragon of Ynys, came out in May 2018.

The Dragon of Ynys is a light fantasy tale suitable for all ages,
starring aro/ace main character Sir Violet, the knight of Ynys. He helps Holly,
a trans woman, to find her missing wife, the baker. They suspect the
ever-thieving dragon who lives near the village might have something to do with
her disappearance…

Cover by Kirby Crow

I also love
drawing and handlettering, using traditional materials—mainly because I haven’t
had the time yet to learn more about digital art. I like to experiment with
different techniques: I’ve been using pencils, watercolour, brushmarkers and
ink, both for original works and fanart. I wouldn’t mind taking this to a
professional level someday, but so far I’ve mainly been drawing for myself and
my friends.

What inspires you?

I grew up
with fairy tales, both the ones my mother read to me as a child and all the
Disney movies I watched so many times. It’s no wonder that I love writing fairy
tales myself. However, the big difference with the tales I consumed at a young
age is that there will always be queer characters in my stories. It’s so
important to be able to relate to characters when you’re trying to figure out
your own identity, and I feel like it took too long before I finally
experienced that moment myself. Once you’ve seen your identity validated in
popular media, it’s so much easier to accept who you are, rather than to
believe those who say you can’t feel the way you feel or be the way you are.

I hope that
my writing will make it easier for future generations to find stories that tell
them they’re not alone, not broken, and that teach them acceptance towards
others as well. In that light, I write the stories that I would love to read
myself, with all the dragons and magic and hopefully wittiness that I adore in
the works of Pratchett, Rowling, Tolkien and other masters.

For more
specific inspiration, my friend Fie and I started a project in 2013, inspired
by Erin Morgenstern’s Flax-golden Tales. Every week, she took a picture for
which I wrote a ten-sentence story. These days we’ve dialled it down to two
photo-story combinations per month, but Paranatellonta
is still going strong after five years! Getting random prompts from friends is
a great way to stay inspired at all times.

When it
comes to visual art, getting an Instagram account has definitely done wonders.
There are a lot of awesome artists out there whose samples inspired me to try
new techniques. Every month there are challenges going around in different
themes, for any kind of art actually, but in my case those mainly influenced my
handlettering. Practice really helps! I also finished Inktober last year. It
once again proved that an inspiring prompt doesn’t need to be more than one
word or one image. You can see my Inktober drawings if you scroll down a little
on my Instagram.

What got you interested in your field? Have you
always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve been telling stories for as long as I can remember. As
I said, my mother read fairy tales to me from a young age, and once I learned
to read myself, my greatest joy was to discover more fun stories. There were
never enough of them, so it only made sense that I wrote down my own as soon as
I could. Surrounded by those fictional adventures, somewhere deep inside I knew
what adventure I wanted to have myself, even when I was five years old: I
wanted to be an author, like those wonderful people who’d given me all those
beautiful tales to enjoy.

My drawing
story is completely different. For a very long time I was convinced I couldn’t
draw at all. I just didn’t have the talent. Looking back at art class in
school, I feel like they never stressed the importance of studying references
enough. I was always doodling in my school books for fun, but it never felt
like that counted.

Fast-forward
to when I’d finished university and my parents were celebrating their 25th
wedding anniversary. I didn’t have much gift inspiration, and they joked about
a “grown-up” child making a drawing for their parents—and the fact it
was a joke tells you enough about how much the arts are respected unless you’re
a Big Name. I often feel like our society expects people either to be a grand
artist or talentless, and the fact that there must be a learning process in
between is often completely neglected.

Anyway, I
went through with it, and as I was drawing my parents from a reference photo,
it turned out pretty okay (especially considering it was supposed to remind
them of a child’s drawing). Most important of all, I had a lot of fun working on it. I’d been looking at a
lot of art online since I’d last taken up a pencil, and combined with using a
reference for the first time, I could see I’d massively improved since my last
school drawing years earlier.

From that
point on I let my more artsy friend Fie convince me to take part in courses on
Skillshare to improve my drawing techniques and handlettering. Now, almost five
years after that anniversary drawing, I actually feel like I’ve made some
pretty things!

Do you have any kind of special or unique
signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to
reveal?

As I
mentioned above, you’ll find many fairy tale elements and queer characters in
my writing. More specifically, you’ll encounter a lot of dragons and spiders.
The dragons are a more conscious choice than the spiders, who just always
happen to show up… Just like in real life, I suppose.

I don’t
think I have any recurring elements in my visual art, but I’ve been using a
signature since late 2016. It’s made up of the initials of both my pen name and
legal name.

What advice would you give young aspiring
artists?

I think
it’s an important message that you can always learn and improve. That’s
something I only truly learned from starting to draw. I’d always been
“born” a writer: I started at a very young age and people told me I was
talented. But I had to work to become
better at visual art, and that made me realise that the reason why I’d loved
writing all my life was that I’d been exposed to so many stories to learn from.
Having played with words from a very young age, stories had never been the big
“mystery” that a beautiful piece of art was. So what I mean to say
is: people aren’t born a Grand Artist. They become them. And going down into
history means you’ve worked hard, but also that you were lucky (or, in some
cases, unlucky) enough to have your name picked up and talked about. But that
luck, too, is something you can influence by promoting your work. Like doing
interviews on awesome websites. 😉

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

I’m asexual
and somewhere on the aromantic spectrum, but I usually go with “aro-spec”
rather than a more specific label, because it’s difficult for me to figure that
one out.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice
or ignorance in your field?  If so, how
do you handle it?

There’s
certainly a lot of ignorance. Even in some queer organisations, it seems the A’s
are often forgotten. I can only hope that my stories will spread more
knowledge, while still being entertaining rather than feeling like a lecture.

What’s the most common misconception about
asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That
asexuality would mean you never have sex. It can mean that, and I guess it does for me. There’s certainly
nothing wrong with a life without sex. But for sex-positive aces it makes
things all the more confusing to figure out their orientation when people keep
asking: “But you’ve enjoyed having sex, how can you be ace?”

Aside from
that, I think that asexuality and aromanticism are too often considered the
same thing. This also makes it hard to find a label that fits you when you do
experience romantic attraction but no sexual attraction, or the other way
round. When different sources tell you that you need to feel things a certain,
very specific way in order to identify as ace or aro, it can be a long search
to find a label that fits. And of course not everyone needs to label their orientation, but in my own experience finding
the names and other people who used them certainly helped to stop thinking I
might be broken or wrong.

What advice would you give to any asexual
individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

You’re not
alone and you’re not broken. For me it was a massive help to enter queer spaces
(in my case on Tumblr) and read experiences from other queer people. It made me
discover terms (like asexual and aromantic) which I’d never heard of before I
made a Tumblr account almost 10 years ago. It showed me that they weren’t some
kind of theoretical concept, but a whole spectrum of people who experienced things in different ways—and some of their
experiences were just like mine! Suddenly I was no longer “the weird
one”. Which actually took me some time to adapt to, because I’d become
quite used to being “just odd” and labelling myself that way 😛

However, in
the long run, learning about all flavours of queer (be it through books, blogs,
or directly talking to others) taught me to be more open-minded in general and
made me more comfortable with myself.

Finally, where can people find out more about
your work?

My website
is http://minervacerridwen.wordpress.com/. There you find everything about
both my writing and drawings, with links to my social media. Feel free to
follow me!

Paranatellonta,
a flash fiction project inspired
by my friend’s photography, can be found at http://paranatellonta.tumblr.com/. It updates twice a month and you can read
all the stories and see all the pictures for free.

My visual art can be found
here: https://www.instagram.com/minerva_cerridwen/. I’m posting pretty much everything I draw
on Instagram, showing my learning process with both the pieces that worked out and
the ones that didn’t. Mainly because I find it interesting to track my own
evolution and learn from that in turn!

Other places you can find
me:

Twitter: https://twitter.com/minerva_cerr
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/minervacerridwen/
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/15904760.Minerva_Cerridwen

And places
to buy my stories:

– The
Dragon of Ynys (Publisher | List of other retailers)
– Unburied Fables (Amazon)

Thank you, Minerva, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Renn

Today we’re joined by Renn. Renn is an extraordinary visual artist who also dabbles in embroidery and sings in their state’s LGBTQ+ chorus. They have mainly worked in traditional mediums, though they have recently started branching out into digital art. Their work is fascinating in its use of color and light. It’s clear Renn is an incredibly talented and passionate artist who enjoys what they do, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to them for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

I’m something of an ace-of-all trades (pardon the pun). Most
of my work has been traditional pen and ink drawings- I’ve always been the most
comfortable with felt pens as my medium since you can re-do the sketch as many
times as it takes to get each line juuuuuuust right before finalizing it in ink.
Every now and then I’ll do a watercolor- the colors can be quite vibrant and
watercolors can blend together in a way markers and ink can’t. Watercolor is
something of an exercise in discipline for me; I’m not the most patient of
persons even without taking my ADHD into account- so waiting for the paint to
dry before adding another piece of color can be trying sometimes. I’ve ruined
plenty of paintings only because I just couldn’t wait! I recently started
painting digitally with my beloved Huion tablet- a much better way for me to
explore painting as a medium because there are no more wait times for colors to
dry! And layers! Oh do I love my layers. Working digitally, I enjoy using a
limited but vibrant pallet to challenge myself to really bring out the
highlights and shadows of what I’m drawing, making the artwork overall more
striking.

Sometimes when I have the time + materials + energy, I craft
my own cosplays (and bowties!) In my spare time I also enjoy doing embroidery
and singing with the Rainbow Chorale, my state’s local LGBTQ+ chorus!

What inspires you?

A lot of my main drive to create comes from seeing the work
of other artists. You know how your brain will see someone else’s work and go
“Gee I wish I could draw like that!”
I take that feeling and turn it into “Well why don’t I go and draw something I
want to create that will look just as good that I and other people will enjoy!”

I also enjoy doing art as an out and visible queer asexual
person, because it gives other people like me the chance to see themselves
reflected in my art and see themselves being represented, even if they
themselves cannot be out and visible like me.

What got you
interested in your field?  Have you
always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve been drawing since I was really little, like 4 or so.
Creating art through drawing was something I would do to relax after
school…  or something I did to avoid
taking notes or doing homework… ah ha. For young, awkward, socially anxious me,
art was the best way for me to express myself and communicate. So, in a way,
I’ve always been interested in creative fields because that ability to create
from my own ideas has always been with me. With respect to “wanting to be an
artist” (I’m interpreting this as become a professional) drawing as a job isn’t
something I want to do. I’m happy to take the occasional commission, or make
something as a gift, but drawing as my main profession isn’t for me. Art is an
escape for me, for when life gets to be too overwhelming. If that escape was
invaded by the stress and pressure to constantly create and keep churning out
artwork, then creating would no longer be that escape for me.

Do you have any kind
of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work
that you’d be willing to reveal?

I always sign my work (well, when I remember) with my
screen-name (Renaissance Aeroplane) initials “RA” and a little airplane flying
out from the “A”. Typically I’ll put it in the corner of digital paintings, and
tuck it in somewhere in sight when I do pen and paper drawings.

I’ve had that screen-name for a while, except ‘renaissance’
was spelled with two Ns since spelling wasn’t a strong suit of mine. Thus that
turned into the nickname “Renn” which I’ve gotten rather attached to and
started using as an offline nickname as well.

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

Take a deep breath, and relax.
Sit back, stretch your arms, and release that tension you’ve been holding
in. It’s okay- if you aren’t as popular as that one artist, if that one line
just refuses to come out right, if you fudged up the inking, painting didn’t
come out the way you wanted it to- It’s
going to be all right!
There’s always so much pressure as an artist, to
keep making more art and be perfect and get likes/reblogs/retweets/site
traffic. That pressure is overwhelming and the last thing that will help you
improve is pushing yourself so hard that creating art becomes stressful and
overwhelming. So take another deep breath, relax, and continue to do what makes
you happy.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum
do you identify?

Definitely full-on asexual; the frying-pan of sexual
attraction feelings won’t be hitting me in the face anytime soon. It’s not a
sensation I’ve ever felt, likely will never feel, and I am cool with that being
so. I’m probably?? somewhere on the gray-bi-romantic scale of things; every now
and then I’ll become romantically inclined towards someone, but it doesn’t
happen all that often. *shrug*

Have you encountered
any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Fortunately I haven’t had much experience with prejudice
aside from the occasional bigot being rude online. What I have encountered more
of is well-meaning but ignorant folks coming into my inbox and expecting me to
educate them. Which can sometimes be annoying, and other times be emotionally
draining and exhausting. So, what I’ll do is send them a few links with good
articles about asexuality (or trans/nonbinary issues because I get questions
about that too. Yaaaaaay.) that I’ve read through beforehand to ensure all the
info is correct. Then I’ll let them know I’m glad they want to learn more, but
I don’t have the time/energy to educate them one on one on the basics, that the
links I sent contain more info about the subject, and once they’ve read through
what I’ve sent and understand it, I’ll be happy to talk with them later.

What’s the most
common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That eventually I’ll “grow out of it” or “there’s always the
possibility you meet the right person!” *barf* I get that for some people,
sexuality can change or you can discover something you didn’t know about
yourself, but that is not me. I already did all my soul-searching and exploring
and I am quite happy labeling myself as ace, thanks very much. That and there’s
something so gross about the insistence that I will become sexually attracted
to someone. Euggggh.

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their
orientation?

It’s helpful to ask for advice or experiences from other ace
folks and to ask other LGBTQ+ folks about their experiences to help you figure
out what you’re feeling- BUT what determines your sexuality, above all, is what
YOU think and how YOU feel. So, if you think “Well I’ve never/rarely/only
sometimes feel sexually/physically attracted to people” then congrats! You’re
ace! And that is for you to decide whether or not you want to label yourself
that way.

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

Y’all can find me on Tumblr at renn-aeroplane-art.tumblr.com
where I post all of my recent works or if you want to trawl my old Deviantart
for some of my older stuff I go by Senkokura
there. If you like goofy cat pictures interspersed with the occasional drawing
or selfie, then check out my Instagram at renaissance_aeroplane!

Thank you, Renn, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Sark

Today we’re joined by Sark, who is the 800th artist interviewed on Asexual Artists. Sark is a phenomenal fanartist and writer. He mostly draws, focusing on drawing characters in fandoms he enjoys. Occasionally, he draws people’s original characters. When he’s not drawing, Sark enjoys writing. It’s clear he’s an incredibly passionate and dedicated artist who loves creating, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to him for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about your art.

Well, I’ve been
drawing for about four years now, and I’ve been writing since, well, actually
since I can remember! I usually focus my work on creating fan content as a
method to express my enjoyment of things, but sometimes I draw people’s
characters because I like seeing people get happy, honestly.

What inspires you?

A lot of things.
One of my main inspirations is the works other people have created, especially
music. I have playlists for all of my characters to get my writing and art in
character for them. And sometimes I just go outside and see something
beautiful. Most of the time I see someone do stupid things and it reminds me
how great people are, and why I enjoy writing and drawing in the first place.

What got you interested in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

Well, I know it’s
probably the tale of everyone ever, but really it was people. When I was
younger- I think maybe eleven- I used to watch a lot of YouTube. It was a lot
of gaming, all these wildly popular channels that were popular a couple years
ago. I enjoyed them a lot, but the idea of making fan content didn’t occur to
me until I met someone who became my role model. They made a lot of animations
and art of these people, and they wrote stories about them. I thought it was
really cool, so I imitated them. I was really bad at drawing and writing, but
they were always really nice. They also were my introduction to the LGBT
community, which obviously is really important to me now. I don’t know where
they are nowadays, I lost track of them along the way, but they’re still my
inspiration.

Do you have any kind of special or unique signature,
symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be
willing to reveal?

My art is about as
consistent as my memory, which is to say not at all, but my signature is
usually a stylized S- I’ll see if I can show an example, I’m really mosh at
description. Which is probably bad, considering I’m a writer.

What advice would you give young aspiring artists?

I still consider
myself an aspiring artist myself, but if I could look back at some of the
worries I used to have about my content not being good enough, or my writing
being cliche, I think I’d only say one thing. And that is that it doesn’t
matter. If you’re just starting out, you probably think your art, or your
music, or your writing sucks. And I won’t lie to you, it probably does. But it
doesn’t matter. Anyone who looks down at people who aren’t as practiced as you
yet aren’t worth your time. Because we were all beginners. Most of us still
are, really. Just keep pushing the boundaries of what you can do until they
grow. And then push harder. That’s what I’m doing.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do you identify?

Asexual
Panromantic. I’m seriously mulling over my romantic identity right now, so I’m
not sure about being pan, which I think is okay, but I’m confident in my
sexuality.

Have you encountered any kind of ace prejudice or
ignorance in your field?  If so, how do
you handle it?

Really no one in
real life that I’ve worked with that are in the LGBT community has treated me
any different than they would treat a gay man, or a lesbian, which is to say
I’ve been treated really well offline. My works are, for better or worse, not
really well known online, which I don’t really mind that much. It means I
haven’t had anyone here really target me for my identity, though from other
cases I’m well aware how nasty people can be when they can be anonymous. I’m
trying to keep my hopes high that I’ll be able to make it in the art and
writing world without too much backlash right now. I think as long as I keep
thick skin, I should be able to do it.

What’s the most common misconception about asexuality
that you’ve encountered?

Really that we’re
all one flavor. People really don’t seem to realize how a diverse of a group we
are. Aces come from all walks of life, and we have all kinds of identities. I’m
a trans man that lives in the suburban south, but I’m far from the only ace
experience. It’s cool. Aces are a cool group of a lot of people, and I really
like it. I wish more people thought about that before talking about us the way
they do.

What advice would you give to any asexual individuals
out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Really, whether or
not you’re Ace is something only you can discover. But if you stay away from
people who will try and influence you and just explore your identity, it can
help you get into touch with how you feel about people. Don’t let people tell
you who you are; only you get a say in that.

Finally, where can people find out more about your
work?

My writing is over
at Sarkshine on Wattpad,
and my artwork can be found at sarkiesark
and at fantrolbs as well as Sarkshine on DA.

Thank you, Sark, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Taylor

Today we’re joined by Taylor. Taylor is a fantastic visual artist who works mainly in graphite, ink, and colored pencils. She mostly does portraits, but has recently started branching out into creative space type drawings. Her work is absolutely beautiful, drawing the viewer in with her attention to detail and use of space. It’s clear she’s a dedicated and passionate artist, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

Hello! So, my art has always been
all over the place, but I have stuck with drawing since childhood. I’ve only
been a hobbyist, taking some drawing classes throughout school, but my goal is
to work part time and run an art studio on the side.

My work is usually black and
white, either graphite or ink, or colored pencil on black paper. I love working
with high contrast and, specifically with portraits, minimalistic shading. I
like working with realism, but I’ve recently branched out into some more
creative, space-y pieces.

What inspires you?

Music has been a huge influence
for me. Despite lacking any musical ability whatsoever, music has been a huge
part of my life. Listening to storytelling in the lyrics, along with themes and
feelings that can only be portrayed through instrumentals, is such a creativity
boost for me and helps me branch out of my artistic comfort zone.

What got you
interested in your field?  Have you
always wanted to be an artist?

Art, as a kid, was the only thing
I really engaged in. I was the type that naturally did well in school, so I
never really had to try or care. However, with art, I could really experiment
and improve my skills, so I devoted all of my time to drawings. As I got into
high school, I began studying fields I saw as potential careers, yet I didn’t
stop drawing.

My overbearing logical side
always stopped me from seeing myself as a professional artist. However, I
realized that, even if I don’t do it professionally, I can still be an artist
and devote myself to my artwork.

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

Don’t stop! You’ll see really, really good artists, and you’ll meet
people who will look down on your art, but you shouldn’t let that get in the
way of your creativity. I completely stopped art for a full year because I felt
I was inadequate and that art would never get me anywhere in life. It was hard
to get out of that funk, but getting back into art was the best decision of my
life.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum
do you identify?

I identify as an aromantic
asexual.

Have you encountered
any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I have gotten some weird backlash
for creating LGBTQ pride art, because I’m not “really a part of the community.”
Honestly, I just ignored it and kept doing what I was doing. Asexuality is a
part of the LGBTQ community, regardless of what anyone else tells you.

What’s the most
common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Since I have divorced parents, no
one believes I am really asexual,
especially aro/ace. They all tell me that it’s because I didn’t grow up seeing
a loving relationship. However, my backstory isn’t traumatic and my situation
doesn’t define my sexuality.

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their
orientation?

Don’t worry about labels in the
beginning. I was so freaked out about whether or I was straight or gay or bi or
anything. If you’re struggling, just be yourself. You may find a label that
perfectly fits, and that can give you a wonderful sense of community and not
being alone, or you might not. Even if you don’t have a perfect label, you are
still valid.

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

I use my Instagram page the most:
at sketchingpencils. I also have a DeviantArt page that I recently started: sketchingpencils.

Thank you, Taylor, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.