Category: visual artist

Interview: Liv

Today we’re joined by Liv. Liv is a fantastic visual artist who specializes in illustration and character design. She draws in a variety of styles and illustrates various subjects. Her work is amazing in its attention to detail and color. She’s a remarkably talented artist, as you’ll soon see. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

My work is mainly illustrations. I do a lot of character
designs, backgrounds … story boards ‘n such. I like working in pastel shades
and bright colors, but I also like making more low-key stuff. Dark blues …
greens … Color and design are usually the main focus in my work, even if I’m
drawing portraits I try to pay very close attention to color. I don’t know
though; my stuff is pretty varied. I make a lot of different types of art. I
make semi-realistic work, characters, portraits, landscapes, buildings … I do
whatever I can to improve myself as an artist.

What inspires you?

Music. For sure music. I need to right song before I start.
The usual music consists of James Blake, Joji, Tyler the Creator … A lot of low
key music. Oh! I also love Tame Impala. I’m also inspired by studio Ghibli
movies and other artists. Other artists online really push my work to be
better.

What got you
interested in your field?  Have you
always wanted to be an artist?

My mom gave me this fairytale book when I was six. It had
her doodles in it when she was my age, and I was really taken by them. (They
weren’t great, they were made by six-year-old mom) but at the time it was crazy
to me that anyone could just … make stuff. I passively drew for a few
more years, then got really serious about it when I was 12.

Do you have any kind
of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work
that you’d be willing to reveal?

Umm haha I have one thing. I don’t sign my work very often,
(which I should do) but when I do, I make it look like a rose. I noticed my
initials naturally made this curve that looked like a flower, so I added a
little flare for the stem.

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

I have a few things actually. I’ll bullet them so they’re
easier to read.

  • Don’t immediately shut down advice. It
    can feel like people are attacking your work, your baby, but they aren’t trying
    to. It helps to hear them out. (if they are trying to put it down though just
    remember it isn’t about you, it’s about that person trying to be entertaining
    or whatever) You will get critiques, some harsher than others, always remember
    that it isn’t meant to be personal.
  • Don’t immediately accept it either. Trust
    your gut. If someone suggests something, and your first instinct is “that’s a
    terrible idea” then maybe listen to
  • Don’t be so hard on yourself. I know it’s
    difficult, but sometimes it’s best to try to ignore that small voice in your
    head that constantly puts you down. Analyze your work, learn from it. But do
    not put it down too much.
  • Let yourself make bad art. It’s still
    practice!! Even if you don’t like it, you’re using those low moments to
    improve! And that’s always good. Even if you hate making it the whole time
    because you hate the piece so much, just finish it and learn from it. It helps,
    I swear.
  • Take time to do things you enjoy.
    Sometimes you need a break from art. DO NOT feel guilty for needing a break.
    Drink some water, play a videogame. You’ve earned it.
  • Don’t let anyone say you can’t make a job out
    of it.
    Not even your family. I mean there’s a huge industry for the arts,
    if you care enough and are dedicated to it, you can make a job out of it. Even
    if your friends or family say you can’t.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum
do you identify?

I don’t feel any sexual attraction to any gender. So, I
guess just asexual.

Have you encountered
any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I’ve only come out to my friends, who are all “SJWs” haha.
They’ve been super accepting. I did, however, come out to someone I was
interested in. They replied with “then how do you know you like me? Like more
than friends?” the question was annoying in my opinion, but I knew it was just
his insecurities speaking and not really him. Well… I would mean that if he
hadn’t led me on then dated one of my best friends behind my back. I haven’t
experienced anything other than that. Almost everyone in my school is pretty
cool with that stuff. I just haven’t come out yet because I don’t think it’s
that big of a deal. If people wanna know I’ll tell ‘em, but I don’t think
advertising it is very… me.

What’s the most
common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Biggest one I’ve encountered is media portraying asexuals as
cold, psychopaths. People seem to go along with that portrayal.  That’s why it’s nice seeing characters like
Todd from Bojack Horseman. It’s great to see a funny, generous, insightful
person in a TV show be asexual.

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their orientation?

Lay low. It’s OK. I
swear you’ll get through it. Take some time to figure your crap out… Just slow
down a little. Remember you aren’t alone, and take some time to yourself to
relax and think over things. Thinking does wonders sometimes.

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

I have an art Instagram account called “living.in.yellow” I post
a lot of my work there, though the posting gets pretty infrequent every now and
then.

Thank you, Liv, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Angelique Nguyen

Today we’re joined by

Angélique Nguyễn. Angélique is a wonderful visual artist and writer. She writes a lot of poetry and short stories, mostly in English and she’s soon going to start writing in French as well. When she’s not writing,
Angélique

does some visual art, mostly drawing and painting. It’s clear she’s a dedicated and passionate artist, as you’ll soon see. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

I will draw and paint visuals from time to time, but my
current works mostly consist of writing.
I like writing poetry and short stories, and I’m currently working one
long-term piece of work.

My mother language is English but French is my up-and-coming
second language; I have plenty of poetry written in either language.

What inspires you?

There are many things out there and within that inspire me.
Often times it is a mix of my current/remembered emotions, my life experiences
or other’s life experiences, the aesthetics of my world, and the lessons I’ve
learned from life and others. I like taking in what happened in my world and
taking it apart, mixing it up, and reconstructing it again to tell stories. The
influences can be big or small. Such influences can be as large as my mother’s
presence in life or as small as the way the white markings fall on my rabbits
coat. Culture is also a very grand influence in my life. I always loved
learning something about my own culture’s or another culture’s stories and
imagining how they would fit together in the grand scheme of storytelling and
human life.

What got you
interested in your field?  Have you
always wanted to be an artist?

Throughout my life, I always knew I wanted to do something
to express my artsy heart, even when society seems to demand me to focus more
on mathematics and science. I’m pretty good at math and science but I find I
will always be more appealed by art and emotion. At the beginning of sophomore
year of high school, my English teacher assigned everyone to write a short
story. As I was writing my short story, I realized that not every good story
needed to be long like a novel. Before, I always had this idea that good
writing takes a very long time and needed to fill a lot of pages. But now I
know that this is not always true.

Do you have any kind
of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work
that you’d be willing to reveal?

I’m relatively new to my creative writing so I still need to
explore what makes my writing unique from others. However, I find myself
attempting to just the pen or fingers write and type away without thinking too
much. Sometimes, it just makes sense to follow your gut feeling and see what
comes out of it. This is especially true for my poetry.

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

If you find there are no big themes or events you want to
base your writing off of, then look for the small things. Even the small things
could have a story behind it. You could make the story behind it. Write what
you want to write and write how you want to write it. Inspiration always
exists; it is up to you to find it. That will lead to you finding your comfort
in writing.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum
do you identify?

For the most part, I identify as a demi-sexual and bi.
However, the truth is that my actual identity is very complicated. Even I don’t
know all the answers to who I am.

Have you encountered
any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

So far, there is no aphobia I have encountered in my field.
If I do encounter it, then I would simply continue living my peaceful a-spec
existence.

What’s the most
common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

The most common misconception about asexuality that I have
encountered is that asexuality is all out being repulsed by sex, which is
simply not true. When I first heard of asexuality, even I thought I qualified
because I was repulsed by sexual activity. Now I know it is simply about
lacking full attraction to any particular person, which is also true of me.
Also, my *favorite* misconception of demi-sexuality is that it is “practical”-
therefore, not a separate orientation. That is also not true because a
demi-sexual actually lacks any attraction to a particular person until they get
to know and bond with them as much as it takes. Whereas a typical allosexual
may instantly feel attraction to this person but still take their time to get
to know them before jumping into any sexual activities. That is the main
difference.

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their
orientation?

It is okay to be or not to be asexual. Sometimes, asexuality
may be permanent for one individual, but not for others. That is okay and
totally valid. Maybe you know your reason to identify as asexual but maybe you
don’t. That’s all right! Exploring my orientation has been a struggle for me,
and it might be one for you too. However, you are never alone. All I suggest is
that you simply move forward and embrace whatever identity you feel is best for
you. If you don’t want any labels then that is okay, too.

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

My work is currently all over the place. But here are some
common spots for posting my work:

Tumblr: 17angelsprings.tumblr.com
(search “my post” or “my poems” and you will certainly find some of my poems
and other works posted there)

DeviantArt: 17angelsprings.deviantart.com
(you can find some written works as well as some visual art stuff)

Wattpad: https://www.wattpad.com/user/17angelsprings
(my current long-term writing project, Speaking
My Language
, is posted there, and that is where I’m compiling poems into
anthologies)

Instagram: 17angelsprings (mainly
reserved for my visual art)

I also hope I can eventually start a YouTube channel about
mainly centered around my writing and being a writer.

Thank you,
Angélique, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Alexa Baird

Today we’re joined by Alexa Baird. Alexa is a phenomenal visual artist and writer who is so ridiculously creative. They’re a fellow indie author who has self-published a number of novels and novelettes, which can be found on Amazon (look them up and supported a fellow ace). They also has a wonderful webcomic entitled Selfinsertale, which looks absolutely fascinating. Also, they’re a fellow Star Trek fan, which is awesome. Alexa is so passionate and dedicated, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to them for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

My main art is writing. I write and self-publish novels and
novelettes about a wide cast of characters including humans, robots, and
magical beings, sometimes all in the same book. I’ve even taken to illustrating
some of my more recent novels though I’ve been creating visual art since
childhood. I also like to create comics and started my current webcomic series
in 2016.

What inspires you?

I always like to say that tea helps with my creative-tea,
but a lot of my inspiration comes from conversations with my friends and the
ideas we spark together about our characters, how various characters would
interact, etc. A lot of my ideas come from the desire to see a specific audience
reaction that I test run by sharing these ideas with my friends.

What got you
interested in your field?  Have you
always wanted to be an artist?

Starting in elementary school, my family and some of my
teachers encouraged my artistic pursuits, though growing up I would jump from
visual arts, to crafts, to music, to visual arts again, and also to writing. I
used to hate writing as a result of the standardized tests I had to take when
younger, but after being introduced to the concept of fan fiction and original
characters I started to spend a lot of time in middle school creating my own
stories as a coping mechanism. Over time I stuck with it and created more and
more stories and characters until I got to where I am today with my novels and
comics.

Do you have any kind
of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work
that you’d be willing to reveal?

It’s subtle and not always consistent, but in a lot of my
novels or series I try to fit in the word “trek” at some point in it as a
nerdy, small reference to Star Trek.

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

Don’t be afraid to try new types of art and don’t be afraid
to change your mind on what sort of artist you are. Maybe you start out as a
writer but you want to try making crafts and find you have more fun with crafts
and don’t want to write any more. That’s fine! Do what makes you happier in the
end. Or maybe you’re a musician who tries painting a few times but end up not
liking it. That’s fine too! You gained experience just from trying something
you don’t normally do. Or maybe you try all sorts of things and have several
different types of art you like and want to pursue. More power to you then,
buddy. Trying new things always gives you more insight, and if you find
something you prefer to do over what you had been doing before then the insight
you gained is one of exploring more about yourself and your desires.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum
do you identify?

I’m ace and aro.

Have you encountered
any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I’ve mainly seen prejudice remarks said to others rather
than to me directly but it’s always hurtful to see. I find the best way to
handle it is to support those who deal with this ignorance to let them know
they aren’t alone in their identity and to understand that while those who are
hateful may be the loudest, they are not the majority and there are ultimately
more kind people in the world than there are bad.

What’s the most
common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That asexual people don’t belong in the LGBT+ community,
usually due to people insisting that asexual people are actually straight. The
most common misconception I see is that a lack of sexual attraction can let a
person pass as straight, or that it means they actually are straight, and
therefore that we aren’t queer enough to be part this community.

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their
orientation?

Asexuality is a normal and valid thing, and there are more
people out there who are also asexual than you can count. Though the common
statistic is only one percent of the world is asexual, that would still mean 76 million people in this world are also
asexual, and I don’t think this takes into account those who due to societal
norms don’t realize they are asexual as well. There is a large community here
that can help and support you, and even if you can’t reach out to them personally
they are still here if you ever need them and will be willing to help you as
well.

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

You can find my books on Amazon at http://www.amazon.com/author/alexabaird
and my webcomic at http://selfinsertale.smackjeeves.com/
and bonus content at my Patreon at http://www.patreon.com/alexabaird

My main Tumblr
and my Instagram username
is allislaughter. And my Twitter is allislaughterEX.

Thank you, Alexa, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Fiona

Today we’re joined by Fiona. Fiona is a wonderful visual artist and writer. For writing, Fiona is working on a number of stories at the moment and enjoys writing a variety of genres. She’s no less versatile when it comes to visual art, doing both traditional and digital art. Her work demonstrates a keen eye and an amazing attention to detail, as you’ll soon see. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

I both write and do visual art. Both vary quite a bit as I
am currently working on 3 extended stories/novels and all three are vastly
different genres. As for visual art, I used to do a lot of traditional art in
varying media (acrylics, graphite, pen, etc.) and most of it was as realistic
as I could get it. Now I do mainly digital art mainly because it’s hard to get
materials for other forms and Photoshop has an undo button… My style in digital
art is still fairly realistic but more comic book like with lines and kind of
soft cell shading.

What inspires you?

I have never been able to give this question a good answer. I
guess I’ll do ‘who’ inspires me because I’m honestly coming up with a blank for
‘what’ inspires me. Currently I am working on a Sci Fi story/novel and that was
really inspired by The Martian by
Andy Weir because I really like the more realistic type of Sci Fi where it
could conceivably happen. In my digital art, my style was inspired a lot by
Fiona Staples’ art (Fionas are generally gr8) though my style has evolved a bit
and is far from just copying what she does. (Hopefully.)

What got you
interested in your field?  Have you
always wanted to be an artist?

When I was a little kid I drew so much it was ridiculous.
Whales mainly for some reason. I kind of lived in the middle of nowhere and the
only thing to do was draw or read so I did that 24/7. I blame that for why I
like to write, read, and draw to this day. I never really wanted to do art as a
job, I’m more science minded, but since I could remember I’ve loved to draw and
I started writing extended stories in probably 6th grade.

Do you have any kind
of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work
that you’d be willing to reveal?

Not particularly… my stuff is way too all over the place to
have a connected symbol of some sort.

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

I know young artists have heard this time and time again but
Practice. When I was younger I always was told I was good at art and it was
just because that’s all I did. I never really took any formal art classes that
would teach me how to draw (I did take some classes but they were more ‘studio
time’ kind of things where the teacher didn’t actually teach anything.) I only
started digital art the summer before last and already my stuff has vastly
improved as I’ve gotten used to the media and practiced with it. Scrolling
through my art blog you can see my improvement in digital stuff from my early
posts to my more recent ones. Other than that I would just have advice for
people who want to improve with anatomy which is take a life drawing class. If
you can’t do that, watch a dance video or something and pause at different
times to do drawings of different lengths. (10 seconds, 30 seconds, 5 minutes
etc.) it really helped me a lot.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum
do you identify?

I am sex repulsed and bi romantic (if you really want to get
into it, demi romantic as well) basically I’m a massive amalgam of ‘hard to
explain’ so I usually don’t go into it lol.

Have you encountered
any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Well, as far as my art goes, I just work in my room and post
stuff online so I haven’t experienced much in that regards. I’ve encountered it
a bit with just people I tell I’m ace (which honestly, hasn’t been that many people)
but mainly it’s just along the lines of ‘wait that’s a thing?’. Ignorance as
opposed to being outright mean basically.

What’s the most
common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Mitosis? Lol. No seriously I’d say the most common is that
ace people are just people who ‘can’t get any’. Like, honey no. I just don’t
want any.

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their
orientation?

I’m really bad at giving advice like this lol but maybe just
that a lot of people feel the same way you do and those who say it’s fake are
just as ignorant as someone who looks at some characters in a language they
don’t speak and insist that therefor, it isn’t a language. (Basically, those
people are just ignorant and you should ignore them). Don’t ask me advice about
coming out because I am just as lost about that.

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

My main blog is kvothe-kingkiller, my art blog
is cork-run and I’m uploading one of
my stories chapter by chapter as I finish them, both on my fictionpress account
(cork-run) and AO3 (cork_run)

Thank you, Fiona, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Isa C.

Today we’re joined by Isa C. Isa is a phenomenal photographer from Costa Rica. She specializes in photographing people, exploring the stories that can be told through a person’s face. Her work is fascinating, showing a fantastic eye and an incredible amount of uniqueness. Isa is so passionate and dedicated, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

image

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

Well I’m a photographer from Costa Rica. I’m still learning,
but always put out my best work. Currently I’m really into portraits, mainly
because I’m interested by people and how much their faces can tell. I love
exploring with different styles and get weird with it. I have the most fun when
the shoots end up being confusing even to me.

The other part of my art is the editing, this is the part in
which I spend most of the time. It’s a long process, but color grading and
making things look magical is what I’ve come to love the most.

image

What inspires you?

I find it incredibly hard to narrow down the things that
inspire me. The more I think about it, the more sources of inspiration pop up
in my head. I guess I’ve always been a person that spends more time inside her
own head than anything else so, in a way, I inspire myself. I know that might
sound a bit arrogant, but I’m not too sure it actually is.

The thing is, most of my ideas come out of, like, odd
feelings that a song, melody or phrase may give me. I cling on to that emotion
and freeze it in an image because otherwise, it’d be gone. Sometimes I end up
shooting self-portraits out of sheer impulse, and the inspiration comes out of
my need to constantly create.

On the other hand, my friend’s inspire me when I shoot them.
Sometimes I star sessions with close to no premeditated ideas because I want to
capture the essence of the person I’m shooting that specific day. So if they
walk in with an air of curiosity, I’ll try to make that the theme. Same goes
with any other emotion.

I guess, I get my inspiration out of the world I’ve built
around myself, and use its unpredictable fluidity to my advantage.

image

What got you
interested in your field?  Have you
always wanted to be an artist?

My dad has always been a lover of the arts, not an artist at
all though. I grew up in a house so completely covered in painting, drawings
photos, and sculptures that it was weird to me when I went to other’s houses
and they had close to non. As a consequence of his love of it, but lack of
ability for it, I was enrolled in plastic arts classes at a very young age. As
thing usually do, it evolved into different interests. I hovered all over the
arts, but kinda just landed on photography when my dad bought me a point and
shoot camera for me to use on a trip and I fell in love with it.

I don’t think so, probably still completely don’t. I like what
my art communicates, and I hope to never stop creating, but I’ll always be a
part time artist. My photos are part of me, but there’s other sides to me too.

image

Do you have any kind
of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work
that you’d be willing to reveal?

Not necessarily, but one thing I know is that every photo I
put out is most definitely a product of my passion and something I am proud of.
There must be tons of edited pictures in my hard drive that will never see the
light of day.

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

Hustle, but with passion. There’s no way you’ll get anywhere
if you don’t put in hours and hours of hard work, but if you stop loving what
you do it’s not really worth it to me. I’m honestly still a young aspiring
artist, so my best advice is to get yourself out there and kick some serious
butt.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum
do you identify?

That THE QUESTION. I’m not big on labels, that’s just my
personal way of thinking. Why limit myself? It took me a long time to land on
asexual, and even a longer time to acknowledge it as part of my identity.

I do like boys, girls and whatever falls in the middle. If I
like you, I just do. Regardless of your gender.

When it comes to sex, I’m not repulsed by it, but instead
have a certain aversion to it. I find pleasure in it, which is undeniable, but
I never want to really do it with anyone. I acknowledge it feels good, I know I
enjoy the feeling, I just don’t want to do it. It’s quite complicated to
explain, but I do hope I’m making myself clear enough.

Have you encountered
any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

Not really, artists have a tendency to be open-minded. I’m
really thankful for that. That being said, I’m somewhat of a private person. If
it doesn’t come up, I will not mention it.

What’s the most
common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That it means I hate sex, or won’t have sex. The fact that I
am not sexually attracted to people doesn’t mean that I won’t do it, or won’t
enjoy it, if the situation arises.

Another matter is that it’s some kind of defect. As if my
aversion to is a reaction to trauma. No one touched me when I was little, no
one forced me to do things I didn’t want to do… I just never felt that
attraction.

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their
orientation?

Take your time, there is no rush. No one gets to tell you
who you are, but yourself. There’s no need to stress about it because
regardless of who you mingle with, or don’t, is your own personal business.
Labels give people comfort, but can also bring distress. If saying you are
asexual makes you feel comfortable, then that’s all you really need.

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

My Tumblr is: itsleatherweather
(but its personal so there’s a lot of random stuff aside from my photos)

My Instagram is: _isacastillo_ (purely my
photography)

My Snapchat: isacastillo90 (I post behind the scenes of
shoots and before and afters a lot. Plus, my life if you are interested. FYI I
don’t add back people I don’t know.)

My Webpage: https://isacastillophoto.wixsite.com/photography
(Includes my portfolio and contact info)

If you came from here and want to talk to me feel free to do
so through any medium you find most comfortable! I love talking to fellow
artists, and art lovers so don’t be shy!

Thank you, Isa, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Baku

Today we’re joined by Baku. Baku is a wonderful visual and fanartist. They mostly do fanart, but have done original work on occasion. They’re incredibly passionate about comics and plan to be a comic artist in the future. Baku is a very gifted artist and their work is brimming with color and life, as you’ll soon see. My thanks to them for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

I’m a fanartist for the most part with random original
pieces thrown in here and there. I’d say my specialty is comic, but I don’t
really think that’s true yet, haha … It is something I’m working towards though.
Being a comic artist. Right now it’s just a lot of doodles, illustrations,
short comics, sometimes fanfictions, sometimes even more out-of-the-blue fan
contents, like song translation for example.

What inspires you?

Naming any specific category of thing wouldn’t seem right,
because I kinda draw and write for the randomest thing … I’d say love. Or
emotions, in general. My strong emotions for something make me pick up my pen.
Drawing and writing has become one of my main ways to express emotions now,
even more of use than just proclaiming it sometimes.

What got you
interested in your field?  Have you
always wanted to be an artist?

I’ve always been a fan of things, if my memory serves me
well. The first time I tried writing was after I read Harry Potter and thought to myself that I wanted to write something
like this. The first time I took drawing seriously was after reading a magical
girl manga and being introduced to the “standard manga style” so to said by my
cousin. I think I’ve always had that fascination with narratives and stories,
and the desire to make them came the moment I was exposed to the possibility.
These people who are still alive made these things, why don’t you try your hand
too, etc., etc.

The fact that I’m very emotion-driven probably adds to my
becoming a fanartist, in that I’m most productive when I feel strongly about
something, and that’s one thing that being a fan delivers plentily.

Do you have any kind
of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that you’d be willing to reveal?

Lampposts, bus stops, electric poles, and liminal spaces in
general. I also draw/write about dreamscapes a lot. Dripping/splashing effects
are my favourite too.

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

Everyone starts somewhere. Everyone goes somewhere. There’s
this special brand of nihilism that I find serves an artist well: all our
struggles are ultimately objectively meaningless, so what matters is our own
perception. If art fits somewhere into your perception, keep it. Do it for
yourself. Give it the meaning you want to. Have your fun.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum
do you identify?

I’m aro/ace.

Have you encountered
any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I am lucky to have found a very accepting community in the
Mob Psycho 100 fandom around the time I started realizing that I’m as aro/ace,
but there are stories told, of course. I myself try to distance myself from that;
luckily no problems have wandered to my part yet.

In my personal life I haven’t officially come out to my
family yet, but I’ve made my decision to not find a life partner quite clear,
and my parents have long accepted (or emotionally dealt with) that. My extended
family is another story; some of them don’t believe I can make it out there as
an artist either. My mom taught me to consider talking to them ‘diplomatic
work’. I’ve never been good at that, but I manage. Most of the comments on my
choices come hand-in-hand with those on my appearance (and how I don’t care
about it as much as I’m supposed to), so it’s a bit easier to dismiss them
altogether.

What’s the most
common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That there are no such thing, mainly. My mom denied the
existence of asexuality and aromanticism when I brought it up to her. Most
people I’ve met in real life say that one can’t live without love, and that
everyone will find their chosen one someday.

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their
orientation?

You are who you are. As long as you hold that belief dear
and clear in your heart, there will be ways to work around everything else.

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

My Tumblr is bakanohealthy: http://bakanohealthy.tumblr.com/

And I have an AO3 account for my fanfictions: http://archiveofourown.org/users/BakanoHealthy

Some of my works are up for purchase in my Redbubble: https://www.redbubble.com/people/bakanohealthy.

Thank you, Baku, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Alex

Today we’re joined by Alex. Alex is a wonderful young  visual artist who does both digital and traditional art. They mainly do fanart and character design. Alex does a lot of drawing and painting, taking inspiration from the world around them. They are clearly a dedicated and passionate artist, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to them for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

I do a lot of digital and traditional art, mainly fan art or
character design, though I’ve been trying to branch out a little more. I’m a
big fan of taking things like animals, plants, or even songs, and turning them
into characters. I really like picking out little details from whatever I
studying and adding them into the design, even if no one but me notices them.

What inspires you?

There are a lot of different things that inspire me. A lot
of times it’s a song, or a bit from a song, a piece of conversation with a
friend, a particular color or color palette, or even just a landscape or a
small thought. For my fanart, a lot of times I get inspiration from other
works, other people, or the other things I mentioned. A lot of time it’s music
though. I listen to music a lot, both when I draw, and much of the other time.
It really sets the mood for my day, and for what I draw

What got you
interested in your field?  Have you
always wanted to be an artist?

I started drawing when I was really little, and have always
been interested in art, though I never really wanted to be an artist seriously
until I started drawing more and more seriously (I wanted to be a geneticist
when I was little, how funny is that). I started doodling whenever I could, and
developed a consistent style, which ended up changing a lot over a short time.
They were all doodles, but I really enjoyed it. I’ve begun drawing even more
seriously, building up more materials, and expanding my horizons

Do you have any kind
of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work
that you’d be willing to reveal?

I like to do little swirlies on my characters cheeks,
shoulders, elbows, and knees, as well as highlights in the hair. I think that
adds to part of my aesthetic around my art. this, as well as the highlight in
the eyes, which, while usually a star, can also help me express the characters
mood. These are some of the more recognizable stylistic things that I use in my
drawings that I really enjoy.

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

Keep practicing! I know I sound like a broken record,
because this what everyone says, but it’s really true! Only through practice
will you be able to find your own style, and then be able to develop it! It’s
really quite amazing how much improvement your art can go through if you just
draw something every day! You can also try expanding your horizons by
challenging yourself. There are many different artist challenges that can
really help, with either coloring, or just to help develop your style as well!
You can study other artists’ art, and through that, improve your own art. You
can also identify what you need to work on with your art, and challenge
yourself to improve on that. For me, it’s things like posing and backgrounds, and
challenging myself to work on them is both really interesting and fun, but also
really beneficial for your art

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum
do you identify?

I’m more towards the sex repulsed side of the ace spectrum.
I’m still trying to figure out the romantic stuff, but I’m pretty sure I’m
panromantic. I think having a partner would be nice, but I don’t want to do
anything more than cuddle and stuff.

Have you encountered
any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I don’t really know about prejudice, per say. When I came
out to my parents, they told me that I should keep an open mind when it came to
everything that I told them. It was kind of a mental shove, and kind of led for
me to tumble down a mental set of stairs. For a week or two I laid at the
bottom of that flight of stairs. It wasn’t their fault at all, but it really
set me back. I haven’t come out to many people, only about 6 or 7 outside my
immediate family. my friends have been really supportive though, and that has
really been helpful. Because of that, my sexuality has really become cemented,
and has become a constant, which I’m immensely grateful for (though I still am
open to any changes, I don’t think they’ll happen)

What’s the most common
misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

As I said earlier, I really haven’t come out to many people,
and so the only misconceptions I’ve really seen are online. I haven’t really
seen much hate either, the only misconceptions I’ve seen are In posts from
aesexual people about aesexuality, and defending aesexuality against those
misconceptions, if that makes any sense. I’ve been really lucky to have people
support me, I know this, and I’m so grateful.

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their
orientation?

I’m not really too good with advice, or with advice about
identity and that sort of thing, but I guess that they should take a break from
thinking about it. This is coming from me, a hypocrite, who can’t go one minute
without thinking about it, and who, before they came out to people, was
constantly questioning everything. You shouldn’t let thinking and questioning
things consume you. Take a walk, draw a picture, read a book, listen to music.
Do something. Let your mind take a break. Take a mental deep breath. As I said,
I’m not too good with advice, and freak out whenever someone says they look up
to me, but I hope that some of this can help!

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

I’m definitely most active on my Instagram, but anyone can
find me pretty much anywhere with at screaming_pinepples (Tumblr, DeviantArt, RedBubble)

I hope you enjoy my art! And I hope that you like what I’ve
had to say!

Thank you, Alex, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Jennifer F.

asexualartists:

Today we’re joined by Jennifer F. Jennifer is a phenomenal visual artist, who specializes in collages. While she’s done a bit of everything, Jennifer is truly passionate about creating collages. Her work shows an amazing eye, making incredible use of colors and lines. The images are so beautiful and they draw you right in, as you’ll soon see. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

So recently I’ve started
creating collages, though my past art has ranged from fifteen years of dancing
to writing to drawing (which I am actually awful at? But it’s fun and I like to
doodle)

What inspires you?

Lately, it’s been pride
flags because there’s so many colors and it makes so many people happy to see
themselves recognized in some sort of media that I love it. However, I also
love nature. Flowers, elements, rock formations, space… They’re amazing and
probably my other big inspiration.

Politics is the other
big one just because I’m a political science/pre-law major. Especially with all
the stuff going on in the news.

And sometimes Disney.

Honestly, life. Life is
probably a more accurate answer.

What got you interested
in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I took a two dimensional
art class over a year ago and I LOVED it. It was an accident, but it was such
great stress relief that I honestly fell in love. Then I quit one of my jobs
and had a bunch of time on my hands… That was when I really started to pick up
the fact that I love collages. I created over 20 pieces in the span of three
months.

Yes, actually! I just
expected to be a dancer, not a collage maker. So, kinda?

Do you have any kind of
special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that
you’d be willing to reveal?

I don’t know if it’s
unique symbol or anything, but I love working with blue and it’s always my
favorite part of a piece is the blue section. It is always is the easiest for
me, so I consider my blue sections part of my signature just because they’re my
favorite?

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

Don’t be afraid to try
your own art style. Do what makes you happy. (That’s generic, right?) But
really. Everyone paints and draws, but your style in it is about you. Choose something
that you think looks neat instead of choosing what you think others want. If
you enjoy it, someone else will too.

Also, take your time and
let your art change. You aren’t going to stay the same, and neither should your
art. So explore! It’s fun. Do something stupid or out of your comfort zone.
You’ll get there.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do
you identify?

Ace, all the way. The
rest of my identity is kind of in the air. That’s the only part I’ve felt the
need to figure out. I’m just me otherwise.

Have you encountered any
kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you
handle it?

Thankfully, not so far.
My first work to gain popularity was an Ace flag, so that was great! In
political science, we don’t really discuss it. My sexuality hasn’t come up,
thankfully.

What’s the most common
misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That I’m also aromantic.
Explaining that the two can be separate, though aren’t necessarily, has been
the most often issue I’ve had. Usually, it turns into a giant lesson on
sexuality, romantic attraction, and gender.

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their
orientation?

Breathe before you do
anything else. Then figure out your feelings. Terms can come last, though it’s
nice to have a community. Your feelings are more important than anything else.
You don’t have to label yourself, and you don’t have to come out. Sometimes
just a term can make you feel better.

And don’t worry. There’s
a community waiting for you wherever you go!

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

Tumblr: collagesofcollege.tumblr.com
RedBubble: https://www.redbubble.com/people/cajunhusker
Facebook: facebook.com/collagesofcollege/
Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/collagesofcollege.

Thank you, Jennifer, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Jennifer F.

Today we’re joined by Jennifer F. Jennifer is a phenomenal visual artist, who specializes in collages. While she’s done a bit of everything, Jennifer is truly passionate about creating collages. Her work shows an amazing eye, making incredible use of colors and lines. The images are so beautiful and they draw you right in, as you’ll soon see. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

So recently I’ve started
creating collages, though my past art has ranged from fifteen years of dancing
to writing to drawing (which I am actually awful at? But it’s fun and I like to
doodle)

What inspires you?

Lately, it’s been pride
flags because there’s so many colors and it makes so many people happy to see
themselves recognized in some sort of media that I love it. However, I also
love nature. Flowers, elements, rock formations, space… They’re amazing and
probably my other big inspiration.

Politics is the other
big one just because I’m a political science/pre-law major. Especially with all
the stuff going on in the news.

And sometimes Disney.

Honestly, life. Life is
probably a more accurate answer.

What got you interested
in your field?  Have you always wanted to be an artist?

I took a two dimensional
art class over a year ago and I LOVED it. It was an accident, but it was such
great stress relief that I honestly fell in love. Then I quit one of my jobs
and had a bunch of time on my hands… That was when I really started to pick up
the fact that I love collages. I created over 20 pieces in the span of three
months.

Yes, actually! I just
expected to be a dancer, not a collage maker. So, kinda?

Do you have any kind of
special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work that
you’d be willing to reveal?

I don’t know if it’s
unique symbol or anything, but I love working with blue and it’s always my
favorite part of a piece is the blue section. It is always is the easiest for
me, so I consider my blue sections part of my signature just because they’re my
favorite?

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

Don’t be afraid to try
your own art style. Do what makes you happy. (That’s generic, right?) But
really. Everyone paints and draws, but your style in it is about you. Choose something
that you think looks neat instead of choosing what you think others want. If
you enjoy it, someone else will too.

Also, take your time and
let your art change. You aren’t going to stay the same, and neither should your
art. So explore! It’s fun. Do something stupid or out of your comfort zone.
You’ll get there.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum do
you identify?

Ace, all the way. The
rest of my identity is kind of in the air. That’s the only part I’ve felt the
need to figure out. I’m just me otherwise.

Have you encountered any
kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you
handle it?

Thankfully, not so far.
My first work to gain popularity was an Ace flag, so that was great! In
political science, we don’t really discuss it. My sexuality hasn’t come up,
thankfully.

What’s the most common
misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

That I’m also aromantic.
Explaining that the two can be separate, though aren’t necessarily, has been
the most often issue I’ve had. Usually, it turns into a giant lesson on
sexuality, romantic attraction, and gender.

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their
orientation?

Breathe before you do
anything else. Then figure out your feelings. Terms can come last, though it’s
nice to have a community. Your feelings are more important than anything else.
You don’t have to label yourself, and you don’t have to come out. Sometimes
just a term can make you feel better.

And don’t worry. There’s
a community waiting for you wherever you go!

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

Tumblr: collagesofcollege.tumblr.com
RedBubble: https://www.redbubble.com/people/cajunhusker
Facebook: facebook.com/collagesofcollege/
Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/collagesofcollege.

Thank you, Jennifer, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.

Interview: Alanna

Today we’re joined by Alanna. Alanna is a phenomenal mixed media artist who dabbles in a bit of everything. She specializes in digital art and animation. When not drawing, Alanna enjoys creating comics. Her work is beautiful and eerie, reflecting her enjoyment of the weird and the macabre. She also loves using intense colors and lighting. It’s clear that she’s a passionate and dedicated artist, as you’ll soon read. My thanks to her for taking the time to participate in this interview.

image

WORK

Please, tell us about
your art.

I’m a bit of a mixed media digital artist; I animate,
illustrate, make comics, write, do 3D, and even dabble in music. I never like
staying in one style, I always like adopting a new trick or tip into my art and
varying it up for each project I choose so I never get stale with what I do.
What is consistent is my obsession with the weird and the macabre and my love
for intense colors and lighting (and seals!)

What inspires you?

Surreal garbage! Bizarre trash! Anything strange and jarring
interests me, fuels my creativity to create something new and unseen. Outside
of the strange I really can find inspiration practically everywhere. Anything
that tickles my fancy will give me an idea for something unique.

What got you
interested in your field?  Have you
always wanted to be an artist?

My mom was an artist so I guess it rubbed off on me. I was
thinking about maybe becoming a scientist but I kind of had a drive for art
since it didn’t require the brainpower haha…

Do you have any kind
of special or unique signature, symbol, or feature you include in your work
that you’d be willing to reveal?

I have a thing about my art where colors and objects play a
strong role in categorizing things. Certain areas and characters usually have
an extremely distinct color or shape to them, so much so it’s bordering onto
obsession to keep things looking the same.

What advice would you
give young aspiring artists?

Practice, practice, practice! Never ever think little of
yourself because you need to improve, many artists take forever to get their
art right, being bad is always the first step to being good. Always, always
draw from life, photos, anatomy books, etc. CONSTANTLY. I made the bad decision
of not doing that as a kid and your work suffers because of that. Also taking
art as a profession is something you really need to think about in the long
run. Find a field with work in it and decide if its really want you want to do.
Make sure to always have a back up plan and understand how this is going to
impact you in the long run.

ASEXUALITY

Where on the spectrum
do you identify?

I’m both Aromantic and Asexual.

Have you encountered
any kind of ace prejudice or ignorance in your field?  If so, how do you handle it?

I usually tell my identity to people I know and trust very
well so my colleagues finding out would be happenstance. As for outside of my
field I completely understand and know my identity is far beyond anything close
to mainstream. Whatever backhand comments I get I understand people have no
idea what this identity is and I’m fine with that even if it is a little
annoying. I relate this back to my digital art because I know too well people
believe I will my art into existence by pressing a button or I can somehow
“draw” a 3D model into existence. People just don’t know and that’s fine for
me, it’s going to take a many years before being ace is even recognized as much
as being gay is. People telling me my identity is fake and that I must have
issues on the other hand I don’t take as lightly.

What’s the most
common misconception about asexuality that you’ve encountered?

Oh, damn, too many, both perpetrated by non-aces and aces alike,
which frankly scares me. I consider asexuality a lack of an orientation or lack
of attraction to genders and many lgbt places do use this too as a definition
though still too many asexual sites list asexuality as having to do with sex,
libido or interest in sex. Shame because being a non sex-repulsed ace I feel
I’m not “ace enough” to be fully asexual because of this stigma. Asexuality has
nothing to do with sex but it doesn’t stop people from believing that.

What advice would you
give to any asexual individuals out there who might be struggling with their
orientation?

Be patient and realize coming out of the closet is not a
one-time experience; it takes years, maybe even decades to fully realize
yourself. Never force yourself into anything, never let anyone decide your
orientation for you, its all up to you in the end. If in the end you realize
you are ace or not that’s fine too, you’re no less valid no matter what label
you find. Also know that it’s even harder for people around you to understand
you right away, parents, friends and relatives may take years, decades to understand
coming out of the closet is but what matters is they love you even if you feel
they don’t “get” what asexuality is. And remember if you feel you’re in an abusive/neglectful
home, you don’t have to tell your parents your orientation, tell people you know
you can trust and when you can, move out. Safety is more important than wanting
acceptance from people who won’t give it. I’ve met people who were kicked out
of their homes and this is the best advice I’ve gotten if you’re not sure about
your situation.

Finally, where can
people find out more about your work?

I have a Tumblr: http://indagold-orchid.tumblr.com/
Various comics I’ve worked on: https://tapas.io/indagold/series
And my Twitter: https://twitter.com/BunSeals.

Thank you, Alanna, for participating in this interview and this project. It’s very much appreciated.